Dharma

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Dharma (or dhamma) is part of many religions or spiritual beliefs that began in India. The oldest is Hinduism. Buddhism, Ayyavazhi, Jainism, and Sikhism also believe in the same idea. It means the law of spiritual growth of believers.

In Buddhism[change | change source]

Buddhism

Dharma Wheel.svg

Basic terms

People

Gautama Buddha
Dalai Lama
Bodhisattva
Sangha

Schools

Theravada
Mahayana
Zen
Vajrayana
Nyingma Kagyu Sakya Gelug

Practices

study Dharma
Meditation
Metta

In Buddhism, the word "Dharma" also means the very old teachings of the Buddha.

In Hinduism[change | change source]

In Hinduism, dharma is the spiritual law for human beings. It is the way of goodness, truth and duty. For example, for a youth, a big part of dharma is to be a good student. Parents’ dharma is to raise and support their family. Teacher’s dharma is to teach and the dharma of the police to protect others. Each age brings new responsibilities, so dharma will change. It is everyone’s dharma to be honest, kind and religious, to do no harm to others and to be a good citizen. Hindus believe that following dharma fulfills the highest purpose on earth. When people follow dharma, they feel good about themselves, and life is most rewarding.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. Saivite Hindu Religion, Book Four for Children Ages 8 to 10