Andrew Bonar Law

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Andrew Bonar Law
Andrew Bonar Law LCCN2002714518.tif
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
In office
23 October 1922 – 20 May 1923
MonarchGeorge V
Preceded byDavid Lloyd George
Succeeded byStanley Baldwin
Leader of the House of Commons [en]
In office
23 October 1922 – 20 May 1923
Preceded byAusten Chamberlain
Succeeded byStanley Baldwin
In office
10 December 1916 – 23 March 1921
Prime MinisterDavid Lloyd George
Preceded byH. H. Asquith
Succeeded byAusten Chamberlain
Leader of the Conservative Party
In office
23 October 1922 – 28 May 1923
Preceded byAusten Chamberlain
Succeeded byStanley Baldwin
In office
13 November 1911 – 21 March 1921
Preceded byArthur Balfour
Succeeded byAusten Chamberlain
Chancellor of the Exchequer
In office
10 December 1916 – 10 January 1919
Prime MinisterDavid Lloyd George
Preceded byReginald McKenna [en]
Succeeded byAusten Chamberlain
Personal details
Born(1858-09-16)16 September 1858
Kingston, Colony of New Brunswick (now Rexton, New Brunswick, Canada)
Died30 October 1923(1923-10-30) (aged 65)
Kensington, London, England
Political partyConservative
SignatureCursive signature in ink

Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923), commonly called Bonar Law (/ˈbɒnər ˈlɔː/),[1] served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.[2]

Law was elected to Parliament in 1900 as a member of the Conservative Party. He became leader of the Party in 1911. He was Lloyd George's Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons while Lloyd George served as Prime Minister during World War I.

Law became Prime Minister in October 1922. He found out he had throat cancer and resigned in May 1923. He died in October 1923.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Bonar Law". Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 21 May 2015. no-break space character in |work= at position 9 (help)
  2. UK Parliament. "Mr Bonar Law (Hansard)". Retrieved 11 April 2020.

External links[change | change source]