Caroline Kennedy

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Caroline Kennedy
Caroline Kennedy US State Dept photo.jpg
United States Ambassador to Australia
Nominee
Assuming office
TBD
PresidentJoe Biden
SucceedingMichael B. Goldman (Chargé d’Affaires)
29th United States Ambassador to Japan
In office
November 19, 2013 – January 18, 2017
PresidentBarack Obama
DeputyJason Hyland
Preceded byJohn Roos
Succeeded byBill Hagerty
Personal details
Born
Caroline Bouvier Kennedy

(1957-11-27) November 27, 1957 (age 64)
New York City, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)
Edwin Schlossberg
(m. 1986; sep. 2015)
Children
Parents
RelativesKennedy family
EducationHarvard University (AB)
Columbia University (JD)

Caroline Bouvier Kennedy (born November 27, 1957) is an American author, attorney, and diplomat. She is the daughter and the only living child of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy and Former First Lady, Jacqueline Kennedy. Caroline had served as United States Ambassador to Japan from 2013 to 2017 as a member of the Democratic Party during the Barack Obama administration.

Early life[change | change source]

Caroline was born at Weill Cornell Medical Center on November 27, 1957 in New York City. Her parents were then Senator John F. Kennedy and her mother Jacqueline Kennedy. She was only three, when her father became the 35th President of the United States. She lived in the White House from January 20, 1961 until his assassination on November 22, 1963. She then lived for a while in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. before moving with her mother and younger brother John in New York City in late 1964.

She graduated from Concord Academy in 1975. She earned a Bachelor of Arts from Harvard University in 1979. She later earned a Law Degree from Columbia University in 1988.

Marriage and family[change | change source]

Caroline married Edwin Schlossberg on July 19, 1986 on his 41st birthday. Caroline and Edwin have three children together. Rose, Tatiana, and John "Jack". On May 19, 1994 her mother Jacqueline Kennedy died in her sleep of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma at 64 years old and her younger brother John F. Kennedy Jr. tragically died in plane crash on July 16, 1999 at 38 years old along with his wife Carolyn and her sister Lauren.

Ambassador to Japan[change | change source]

Caroline was the nominee of President Barack Obama to be Ambassador to Japan.[1] On July 24, 2013, Obama announced Kennedy as his nominee to succeed current Ambassador John Roos.[2][3] Caroline was confirmed by the Senate on October 16, 2013 and she had became the first female American Ambassador to Japan.[4] The prospective nomination was first reported in February 2013[5] and, in mid-July 2013, formal diplomatic agreement was reportedly received from the Japanese government.[6] She assumed her ambassador duties on November 13, 2013.

Ambassador to Australia[change | change source]

In May 2021, it was reported that President Joe Biden was seriously considering nominating Caroline as the United States Ambassador to Australia.[7][8] It was reported on July 23, 2021 that Biden would soon nominate Kennedy as Ambassador to Australia.[9]

References[change | change source]

  1. "President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts". Whitehouse.Gov. July 24, 2013. Retrieved July 24, 2013.
  2. "Caroline Kennedy chosen as Ambassador to Japan". Politico. July 24, 2013. Retrieved July 24, 2013.
  3. Landler, Mark, "Caroline Kennedy Chosen to Be Japan Ambassador", New York Times, July 24, 2013. Retrieved 2013-07-24.
  4. Christian science Monitor
  5. bloomberg.com, February 27, 2013.
  6. Kamen, Al, "Caroline Kennedy poised for Japan", Washington Post, July 13, 2013. Retrieved 2013-07-13.
  7. "Caroline Kennedy in running to be named US ambassador to Australia: report". Sydney Morning Herald. May 30, 2021.
  8. "Caroline Kennedy reportedly in line to be next US ambassador to Australia". The Guardian. May 30, 2021. Retrieved May 30, 2021.
  9. "Biden poised to nominate Caroline Kennedy as US ambassador to Australia". CNN. Retrieved 2021-07-23.