Frederick Muhlenberg

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Frederick Muhlenberg
Frederick Muhlenberg.jpg
1st Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
In office
December 2, 1793 – March 4, 1795 [as 3rd Speaker]
Preceded byJonathan Trumbull Jr.
Succeeded byJonathan Dayton
In office
April 1, 1789 – March 4, 1791 [as 1st Speaker]
Preceded byOffice established
Succeeded byJonathan Trumbull Jr.
1st Dean of the United States House of Representatives
In office
March 4, 1789 – March 4, 1797
Preceded byTitle established
Succeeded byThomas Hartley
George Thatcher
Member of the
U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania
In office
March 4, 1789 – March 4, 1797
Preceded byConstituency established
Succeeded byBlair McClenachan (2nd)
ConstituencyAt-large (1789–91)
2nd district (1791–93)
At-large (1793–95)
2nd district (1795–97)
Delegate from Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress
In office
1779–1780
Personal details
Born
Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg

(1750-01-01)January 1, 1750
Trappe, Pennsylvania
DiedJune 4, 1801(1801-06-04) (aged 51)
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic-Republican (1795–1801)
Anti-Administration (1791–1795)
Pro-Administration (before 1791)
Alma materUniversity of Halle
ProfessionMinister of religion
Signature
Official nameFrederick A. C. Muhlenberg (1750-1801)
TypeRoadside
DesignatedApril 12, 2008[1]
Location151 W Main St., Trappe, across from strip mall

Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (/ˈmjuːlɪnbɜːrɡ/; January 1, 1750 – June 4, 1801) was an American minister and politician.

He was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives serving from 1793 through 1795. He was a delegate to the Pennsylvania state constitutional convention and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania and a Lutheran pastor by profession. Muhlenberg was born in Trappe, Pennsylvania.

The claim that Muhlenberg, as House Speaker, prevented German from becoming an official language of the United States is false.[2][3]

References[change | change source]

  1. "PHMC Frederick A. C. Muhlenberg (1750-1801)". Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  2. Bastian Sick: German as the official language of the USA?
  3. Willi Paul Adams: The German Americans. Chapter 7: German or English

Other websites[change | change source]