Murugan

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Murugan
God of War and Victory
Commander of the Gods
Kartikeya
Kartikeya or Murugan is the philosopher-warrior god of Hinduism, variously represented.[1]
Other namesSubramanya, Kumara, Muruga, Skanda, Saravana, Shadanana, Devasenapati, Shanmukha
AffiliationDeva
AbodeMount Kailash
PlanetMangala
MantraOṃ Saravaṇa Bhava
Om Saravaṇa Bhavāya Namaḥ [2]
WeaponVel, bow and arrow
AnimalsPeacock, rooster, snake[3]
DayTuesday
ColorRed
MountPeacock
GenderMale
FestivalsSkanda Sashti or Shashthi and Thaipusam
Personal information
ConsortDevasena and Valli
Parents
SiblingsGanesha (brother)

Murugan, also known as Kartikeya, (Tamil: முருகன்) is the Tamil god of war and victory. Muruga is the main god of worship in Tamil Nadu, South India, Sri Lanka, Mauritius and many other places where Tamilans live. He is a god with six faces. The god Murugan has six shrines in Tamil Nadu, which are known as Arupadaiveedu. In Tamil Nadu, Murugan has continued to be popular with all classes of society right since the Sangam age.

The asuras are seen as demi-gods in the buddhist and hindu religion, and those beings are always fighting with the gods because of their jealousy about the pleasure of the senses that experience the (gods) devas.


Murugan is the son of Shiva and Parvathi, who was created by Lord Shiva to kill the asuras and be the eternal protector of the Devas and other living beings. The six sites at which Murugan sojourned while leading his armies against are Palani, Swamimalai, Thiruparamkundram, Pazhamudirsolai, Thiruthani and Thiruchendur which all are in Tamil Nadu known as Arupadaiveedu the six divine abodes of Murugan on earth,each having its own spiritual history and significance

References[change | change source]

  1. Fred W. Clothey 1978, pp. 1-2.
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 17 November 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. https://www.deccanherald.com/content/373661/land-snake-god.html#main-content Archived 25 April 2017 at the Wayback Machine