Czechs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Czechs
Comenius, Jan Hus, Frantisek Palacky, Jan Evangelista Purkinje, Charles IV, Alfons Mucha, Vratislav II, Bedřich Smetana
Total population

over 12 million

Regions with significant populations
 Czech Republic: 9,246,784 (July 2007 est.)[1]

 United States: 1,462,413[2]

 Canada: 98,090 (2006)[3]

 United Kingdom: 30,000 - 90,000

 Germany: 20,000-50,000

 Slovakia: 46,000

 Argentina: 38,000

 Australia: 21,196[4]

 Austria: 20,000

 Switzerland: 20,000

 Ukraine: 11,000

 France: 10,731 (1990)

 Croatia: 10,510 (2001)

Flag of Israel.svg: 8,000

 Sweden: 7,175 (2001)

Flag of Ireland.svg Ireland: 5,278[5]

 Spain: 5,622 (2006)

 Russia: 5,000~6,000

 Brazil: 5,000[6]

 Netherlands: 3,500

 Romania: 3,339 (2002)

 Poland: 3,000

 South Africa: 2,300

 Serbia: 2,211 (2002)

Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico: 2,000

 Bosnia and Herzegovina: 600~1,000[7]

 Bulgaria: 436

in the Czech Republic include

Languages
Czech
Religions
Non-religious 59%, Roman Catholic 26.8%, Protestant 2.1%, other 3.3%, unspecified 8.8%[8]
Related ethnic groups
other West Slavs[9]

Czechs (Czech: Češi, Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛʃɪ], archaic Czech: Čechové [ˈtʃɛxɔvɛː]) are a western Slavic people of Central Europe. Most live in the Czech Republic. Small amounts of Czechs also live in Slovakia, Austria, U.S., Brazil, Argentina, Canada, Germany, Russia and other countries. They speak the Czech language, which is closely related to the Slovak and Upper Sorbian language.[10]

References[change | change source]