Dzerzhinsk, Russia

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Dzerzhinsk
Дзержинск
Dzerzhinsk Montage.png
Coat of arms of Dzerzhinsk
Location of Dzerzhinsk
Dzerzhinsk is located in Russia
Dzerzhinsk
Dzerzhinsk
Location of Dzerzhinsk
Dzerzhinsk is located in Nizhny Novgorod Oblast
Dzerzhinsk
Dzerzhinsk
Dzerzhinsk (Nizhny Novgorod Oblast)
Coordinates: 56°14′N 43°27′E / 56.233°N 43.450°E / 56.233; 43.450Coordinates: 56°14′N 43°27′E / 56.233°N 43.450°E / 56.233; 43.450
CountryRussia
Federal subjectNizhny Novgorod Oblast[1]
First mentioned1606
Government
 • MayorIvan Noskov[2]
Area
 • Total421.53 km2 (162.75 sq mi)
Elevation
90 m (300 ft)
Population
 • Total240,742
 • Estimate 
(2018)[4]
230,639 (−4.2%)
 • Density570/km2 (1,500/sq mi)
 • Subordinated tocity of oblast significance of Dzerzhinsk
 • Capital ofcity of oblast significance of Dzerzhinsk
 • Urban okrugDzerzhinsk Urban Okrug
 • Capital ofDzerzhinsk Urban Okrug
Time zoneUTC+3 (MSK Edit this on Wikidata[5])
Postal code(s)[6]
606000—606039
Dialing code(s)+7 8313
OKTMO ID22721000001
City DayLast Sunday of May
Twin townsBitterfeld-Wolfen, Hrodna, Druskininkai, ZelenodolskEdit this on Wikidata
Websitewww.dzr.nnov.ru
Dzerzhinsk aerial view

Dzerzhinsk (Russian: Дзержинск, IPA: [dʲzʲɪˈrʐɨnsk]) is a city in Nizhny Novgorod Oblast, Russia. It is on the Oka River. It is about 370 kilometers (230 mi) east of Moscow and 35 kilometers (22 mi) west of Nizhny Novgorod. Population: 240,742 (2010 Census);[3] 261,334 (2002 Census);[7] 285,071 (1989 Census).[8]

It was previously known as Rastyapino (until 1929).[9]

History[change | change source]

Shukhov Tower on the Oka River near Dzerzhinsk (about 12 km away from the city center)

It was first mentioned in 1606 as Rastyapino (Растя́пино). It is now named after Felix Dzerzhinsky. Dzerzhinsky was a Bolshevik leader who was the first leader of the Soviet Cheka (secret police).[10]

Chemical weapons and other production[change | change source]

Dzerzhinsk is a large center of the Russian chemical production industry. In the past, the city was also one of Russia's main areas for the making of chemical weapons. Because of its strategic importance, the city was, until recently, officially closed to foreign visitors.

The making of chemical weapons started in 1941. It was mainly focused on the making of lewisite and yperite (mustard gas). The factory producing these substances was named the Kaprolactam (or Caprolaktam) Organic Glass Factory. It also made prussic acid and phosgene.

The making of chemical weapons at Dzerzhinsk stopped in 1965. Some materials were moved to storage areas. Lots of waste material was buried in dumps at the site of the factory. The yperite facility was destroyed in 1994. As of 1998, the lewisite production area was still not completely destroyed.

As of 2008, Dzerzhinsk had 38 large industrial enterprises, which export their goods worldwide. About one thousand types of chemical products are made in Dzerzhinsk.

Notable people[change | change source]

Twin towns and sister cities[change | change source]

Dzerzhinsk is twinned with:

References[change | change source]

  1. Law #184-Z
  2. Глава Администрации городского округа город Дзержинск. admdzr.ru (in Russian). Archived from the original on 18 April 2018. Retrieved 27 December 2019.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1 [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года (2010 All-Russia Population Census) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. 2011. Retrieved June 29, 2012.
  4. "26. Численность постоянного населения Российской Федерации по муниципальным образованиям на 1 января 2018 года". Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  5. "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). 3 June 2011. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  6. Почта России. Информационно-вычислительный центр ОАСУ РПО. (Russian Post). Поиск объектов почтовой связи (Postal Objects Search) (in Russian)
  7. Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек [Population of Russia, its federal districts, federal subjects, districts, urban localities, rural localities—administrative centers, and rural localities with population of over 3,000]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. May 21, 2004. Retrieved 9 Feb 2012.
  8. Demoscope Weekly (1989). Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров. [All Union Population Census of 1989. Present population of union and autonomous republics, autonomous oblasts and okrugs, krais, oblasts, districts, urban settlements, and villages serving as district administrative centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года (All-Union Population Census of 1989) (in Russian). Institute of Demographics of the State University—Higher School of Economics. Retrieved 9 Feb 2012.
  9. Emmanuel Carrère (21 October 2014). Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. p. 23. ISBN 978-0-374-70921-1.
  10. Emmanuel Carrère (21 October 2014). Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. p. 23. ISBN 978-0-374-70921-1.
  11. Irina Voronina page on IMDB
  12. "Dzershinsk" (in German). bitterfeld-wolfen.de. Retrieved 2019-06-04.
  13. "Города побратимы" (in Russian). grodno.gov.by. Archived from the original on October 9, 2018. Retrieved 2019-06-04.
  14. "Bendra informacija" (in Lithuanian). info.druskininkai.lt. Archived from the original on 2018-10-18. Retrieved 2019-06-04.
  15. "Города побратимы" (in Russian). admdzr.ru. Archived from the original on 2018-10-05. Retrieved 2019-06-04.

Other websites[change | change source]