Henderson County, North Carolina

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Henderson County
Henderson County Courthouse in Hendersonville
Henderson County Courthouse in Hendersonville
Map of North Carolina highlighting Henderson County
Location within the U.S. state of North Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting North Carolina
North Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°20′N 82°29′W / 35.34°N 82.48°W / 35.34; -82.48
Country United States
State North Carolina
FoundedDecember 15, 1838
Named forLeonard Henderson
SeatHendersonville
Largest cityHendersonville
Area
 • Total375 sq mi (970 km2)
 • Land373 sq mi (970 km2)
 • Water2.2 sq mi (6 km2)  0.6%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
117,417
 • Density286/sq mi (110/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district11th
Websitewww.hendersoncountync.org

Henderson County is a county in the U.S. state of North Carolina. In 2010, 106,740 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Hendersonville.[2]

History[change | change source]

The county was made in 1838 from the southern part of Buncombe County. It was named for Leonard Henderson, Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 1829 to 1833.

Government[change | change source]

Henderson County is part of the local Land-of-Sky Regional Council of governments.

Bordering counties[change | change source]

These counties are bordered to Henderson County:

Communities[change | change source]

These communities are in Henderson County:

Cities[change | change source]

Towns[change | change source]

Village[change | change source]

Census-designated places[change | change source]

Unincorporated communities[change | change source]

Townships[change | change source]

  • Blue Ridge
  • Clear Creek
  • Crab Creek
  • Edneyville
  • Green River
  • Hendersonville
  • Hoopers Creek
  • Mills River

References[change | change source]

  1. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.

Other websites[change | change source]