Japanese Grand Prix

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Japanese Grand Prix
Suzuka Circuit
(2003–present)
Suzuka circuit map--2005.svg
Race information
Number of times held45
First held1963
Most wins (drivers)Germany Michael Schumacher (6)
Most wins (constructors)United Kingdom McLaren (9)
Circuit length5.807 km (3.608 mi)
Race length307.471 km (191.053 mi)
Laps53
Last race (2019)
Pole position
Podium
Fastest lap

The Japanese Grand Prix is a race the FIA Formula One World Championship calendar. Usually, this race is one of the last races of the season.

The Japanese Grand Prix has been hosted by both the Fuji Speedway and the Suzuka Circuit. Fuji Speedway is owned by Toyota and Suzuka Circuit is owned by their rival Honda. In July 2009, Toyota announced it would not host the race at Fuji Speedway in 2010 and beyond due to a downturn in the global economy.[1]

History[change | change source]

Inaugural races[change | change source]

The first Formula 1 Japanese Grand Prix, in 1976, was held at the Fuji Speedway, west of Yokohama. The race was to become famous for the battle between James Hunt and Niki Lauda for the championship. The race was held during monsoon rain conditions. Lauda had survived a near-fatal crash at the German Grand Prix earlier in the season. He withdrew from the Japanese Grand Prix fearing for his safety. Hunt finished third, and ended up winning championship by a margin of one point.

Hunt returned to win the second Japanese Grand Prix. There was a collision between Gilles Villeneuve and Ronnie Peterson in the race. Villeneuve's Ferrari flew off the track and killed two spectators.[2] The Japanese Grand Prix did not return to Formula One for another decade.

Return to Japan at Suzuka[change | change source]

Formula One returned to Japan in 1987. This time, it was hosted by the Suzuka Circuit, south west of Nagoya. The circuit was set inside a amusement park, and owned by Honda. Honda used the circuit as a test track. The Suzuka circuit was the first figure-eight race track in F1. One section of the track passes over the other on a bridge.

Alternating between Suzuka and Fuji[change | change source]

The FIA announced on 24 March 24 2006 that future races will again be held at Fuji Speedway. Fuji had been redesigned by Hermann Tilke.[3]

Formula One announced On 8 September 2007, that Fuji will alternate hosting the Japanese Grand Prix with Suzuka. This will start in 2009.[4]

Fuji Speedway withdraws[change | change source]

In July 2009, Toyota cited a global economic slump as the reason that the Japanese Grand Prix would not return to Fuji Speedway in 2010 and beyond. The speedway argued, according to the Associated Press, that "continuing to host F1 races could threaten the survival of the company." As a result, the 2010 Grand Prix will be held at Suzuka.[5]

Sponsors[change | change source]

Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix 1987-2009

Winners of the Japanese Grand Prix[change | change source]

Repeat winners (drivers)[change | change source]

Drivers in bold are competing in the Formula One championship in the current season.
A pink background indicates an event which was not part of the Formula One World Championship.

Wins Driver Years won
6 Germany Michael Schumacher 1995, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004
5 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton 2007, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018
4 Germany Sebastian Vettel 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013
2 Japan Motoharu Kurosawa 1969, 1973
Austria Gerhard Berger 1987, 1991
Brazil Ayrton Senna 1988, 1993
United Kingdom Damon Hill 1994, 1996
Finland Mika Häkkinen 1998, 1999
Spain Fernando Alonso 2006, 2008

Repeat winners (constructors)[change | change source]

Teams in bold are competing in the Formula One championship in the current season.
A pink background indicates an event which was not part of the Formula One World Championship.

Wins Constructor Years won
9 United Kingdom McLaren 1977, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1998, 1999, 2005, 2007, 2011
7 Italy Ferrari 1987, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
6 Germany Mercedes 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
4 Austria Red Bull 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013
3 United Kingdom Benetton 1989, 1990, 1995
United Kingdom Williams 1992, 1994, 1996
2 United Kingdom Lotus 1963, 1976
Germany Porsche 1964, 1967
Japan Nissan 1968, 1969
France Renault 2006, 2008

Repeat winners (engine manufacturers)[change | change source]

Manufacturers in bold are competing in the Formula One championship in the current season.
A pink background indicates an event which was not part of the Formula One World Championship.

Wins Manufacturer Years won
11 Germany Mercedes * 1998, 1999, 2005, 2007, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
10 France Renault 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013
7 Italy Ferrari 1987, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
United States Ford ** 1963, 1972, 1976, 1977, 1989, 1990, 1993
2 Japan Honda 1988, 1991

* Between 1998-2005 built by Ilmor

** Built by Cosworth

Formula One era – by year[change | change source]

Fuji used in 2007 and 2008
Fuji used in 1976 and 1977
A map of all the locations of the Grands Prix held in Japan
Year Driver Constructor Location Report
1976 United States Mario Andretti Lotus-Ford Fuji Report
1977 United Kingdom James Hunt McLaren-Ford Report
1978

1986
Not held
1987 Austria Gerhard Berger Ferrari Suzuka Report
1988 Brazil Ayrton Senna McLaren-Honda Report
1989 Italy Alessandro Nannini Benetton-Ford Report
1990 Brazil Nelson Piquet Benetton-Ford Report
1991 Austria Gerhard Berger McLaren-Honda Report
1992 Italy Riccardo Patrese Williams-Renault Report
1993 Brazil Ayrton Senna McLaren-Ford Report
1994 United Kingdom Damon Hill Williams-Renault Report
1995 Germany Michael Schumacher Benetton-Renault Report
1996 United Kingdom Damon Hill Williams-Renault Report
1997 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari Report
1998 Finland Mika Häkkinen McLaren-Mercedes Report
1999 Finland Mika Häkkinen McLaren-Mercedes Report
2000 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari Report
2001 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari Report
2002 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari Report
2003 Brazil Rubens Barrichello Ferrari Report
2004 Germany Michael Schumacher Ferrari Report
2005 Finland Kimi Räikkönen McLaren-Mercedes Report
2006 Spain Fernando Alonso Renault Report
2007 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton McLaren-Mercedes Fuji Report
2008 Spain Fernando Alonso Renault Report
2009 Germany Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault Suzuka Report
2010 Germany Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault Report
2011 United Kingdom Jenson Button McLaren-Mercedes Report
2012 Germany Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault Report
2013 Germany Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault Report
2014 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Report
2015 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Report
2016 Germany Nico Rosberg Mercedes Report
2017 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Report
2018 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Report
2019 Finland Valtteri Bottas Mercedes Report

Pre-Formula One era – by year[change | change source]

Kuniomi Nagamatsu won the 1971 race driving a Mitsubishi Colt F2000
Year Driver Car Location Category Report
1963 United Kingdom Peter Warr Lotus 23-Ford[6] Suzuka Sports Cars Report
1964 United Kingdom Michael Knight Brabham BT9[7] Formula Junior[7] Report
1965 Not held
1966 Japan Yoshikazu Sunako Prince R380[8] Fuji Report
1967 Japan Tetsu Ikuzawa Porsche 906[9] Report
1968 Japan Moto Kitano Nissan R381-Chevrolet[10] Report
1969 Japan Motoharu Kurosawa Nissan R382[11] Report
1970 Not held
1971 Japan Kuniomi Nagamatsu Mitsubishi Colt F2000[12] Fuji Report
1972 United Kingdom John Surtees Surtees TS10-Ford BDG[13] Formula Libre[13]
Formula Two[13]
Formula 2000[13]
Report
1973 Japan Motoharu Kurosawa March Report
1974 Not held
1975 Japan Masahiro Hasemi March Fuji Report

Broadcasting[change | change source]

United Kingdom[change | change source]

Year Network Lap-by-lap Colour commentator(s)
2016 Sky Sports F1 David Croft Martin Brundle
Channel 4 Ben Edwards David Coulthard
2015 Sky Sports F1 David Croft Martin Brundle
BBC One Ben Edwards David Coulthard
2014 Sky Sports F1 David Croft Martin Brundle
BBC One Ben Edwards David Coulthard
2013 Sky Sports F1 David Croft Martin Brundle
BBC One Ben Edwards David Coulthard
2012 Sky Sports F1 David Croft Martin Brundle
BBC One Ben Edwards David Coulthard
2011 Martin Brundle
2010 Jonathan Legard Martin Brundle
2009
2008 ITV James Allen
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002 F1 Digital+ Ben Edwards John Watson
ITV James Allen Martin Brundle
2001
2000 Murray Walker
1999
1998
1997
1996 BBC Two Jonathan Palmer
Eurosport Ben Edwards John Watson
1995 BBC Two Murray Walker Jonathan Palmer
Eurosport Ben Edwards John Watson
1994 BBC Two Murray Walker Jonathan Palmer
Eurosport Allard Kalff John Watson
1993 BBC One Murray Walker James Hunt
Eurosport Allard Kalff John Watson
1992 BBC One Murray Walker James Hunt
Eurosport Allard Kalff John Watson
1991 BBC Two Murray Walker James Hunt
Eurosport Richard Nicholls John Watson
1990 BBC Two Murray Walker James Hunt
Eurosport Richard Nicholls John Watson
1989 BBC Two Murray Walker James Hunt
1988
1987
1977 ITV Andrew Marriott
1976 BBC One Murray Walker Barrie Gill
ITV Andrew Marriott

References[change | change source]

  1. Kato, Taku (2009-07-07). "Toyota's Fuji Speedway Cancels Formula One Grand Prix From 2010". bloomberg.com. BLOOMBERG L.P. Retrieved 2010-08-10.
  2. Tomlin, Jim (2005-06-11). "Major incidents of fan deaths". St. Petersbrg Times. St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved 2010-08-10.
  3. "Suzuka loses Japanese GP to Fuji". BBC News. 2006-03-24. Retrieved 2010-05-05.
  4. "Japanese Grand Prix to alternate between Fuji and Suzuka". formula1.com. Formula One Administration Ltd. 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2010-08-10.
  5. "Toyota to pull out of hosting 2010 Japan GP". Mainichi Daily News. 2009-07-07. Retrieved 2009-07-07.
  6. GP Japan, 3.5.1963, www.racingsportscars.com Retrieved 19 June 2017
  7. 7.0 7.1 Brabham BT9, www.oldracingcars.com Retrieved 19 June 2017
  8. Prince R380-I (1966 : R380), www.nissan-global.com Retrieved 19 June 2017
  9. GP Japan, 3.5.1967, www.racingsportscars.com Retrieved 19 June 2017
  10. GP Japan, 3.5.1968, www.racingsportscars.com Retrieved 19 June 2017
  11. GP Japan, 10.10.1969, www.racingsportscars.com Retrieved 19 June 2017
  12. COLT F2000, www.mitsubishi-motors.co.jp Archived 6 January 2017 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 19 June 2017
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 VII Grand Prix of Japan 1972, www.formula2.net Retrieved 19 June 2017

Other websites[change | change source]