Johnson City, Tennessee

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Johnson City, Tennessee
City of Johnson City
Downtown Johnson City
Downtown Johnson City
Location of Johnson City in Carter, Sullivan and Washington Counties, Tennessee.
Location of Johnson City in Carter, Sullivan and Washington Counties, Tennessee.
Johnson City, Tennessee is located in Tennessee
Johnson City, Tennessee
Johnson City, Tennessee
Location of Johnson City in Tennessee
Coordinates: 36°20′N 82°22′W / 36.333°N 82.367°W / 36.333; -82.367Coordinates: 36°20′N 82°22′W / 36.333°N 82.367°W / 36.333; -82.367
CountryUnited States
StateTennessee
CountiesWashington
Founded1856
Incorporated1869[1]
Founded byHenry Johnson
Government
 • TypeCouncil-manager government
 • MayorJoe Wise (I)[2]
 • Vice MayorDr. Todd Fowler
 • City ManagerM. Denis "Pete" Peterson
 • City CommissionersJenny Brock
Aaron T. Murphy
John Hunter
Area
 • City43.60 sq mi (112.93 km2)
 • Land43.28 sq mi (112.10 km2)
 • Water0.32 sq mi (0.83 km2)
Elevation
1,634 ft (498 m)
Population
 (2020)
71,046
 • Density1,545.78/sq mi (596.82/km2)
 • Metro
198,716[4]
 • CSA
508,260 (88th)[4]
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
37601-37604, 37614, 37615 & 37684
Area code(s)423
Websitewww.johnsoncitytn.org

Johnson City is a city in Washington, Carter, and Sullivan counties in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is mostly in Washington County. The population is 71,046, making it the eighth largest city in Tennessee.[5] During the American Civil War before 1869 the name of the town was briefly changed to "Haynesville" in honor of Confederate Senator Landon Carter Haynes.[6]

Johnson City is the principal city of the Johnson City Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is also a component of the Johnson City–KingsportBristol, Tennessee–Virginia Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. The CSA is the fifth-largest in Tennessee with an estimated 500,530 residents.[7]

Economy[change | change source]

Mountain Dew can trace it's origins to the city.

The popular citrus soda Mountain Dew traces its origins to Johnson City. In July 2012, PepsiCo announced a new flavored version of the drink named Mountain Dew Johnson City Gold in honor of the city. The drink was test marketed in the Chicago metropolitan area, Denver, and Charlotte, beginning in late August.[8]

Colleges and universities[change | change source]

East Tennessee State University has around 16,000 students in addition to a K-12 University School, a laboratory school of about 540 students.[9] University School was the first laboratory school in the nation to adopt a year-round academic schedule.[10]

Milligan University is just outside the city limits in Carter County. It has about 1,200 students in undergraduate and graduate programs.

Northeast State Community College has renovated a building in downtown Johnson City for use as a new satellite teaching site.[11]

Tusculum College is on the north side of Johnson City in the Boones Creek area.

References[change | change source]

  1. Tennessee Blue Book, 2005-2006, pp. 618-625.
  2. Daniel, Anslee (September 24, 2020). "Johnson City's Commission race turns partisan". WJHL-TV. Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  3. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Tennessee Census Data (Memphis, Nashville-Davidson, Knoxville: estimated, metropolitan, areas) - (TN) - City-Data Forum". www.city-data.com.
  5. "Johnson City city, Tennessee". quickfacts.census.gov. United States Census Bureau.
  6. Haskell, Jean. Johnson City. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Accessed: December 25, 2009.
  7. "US Census 2008 CSA Estimates". March 27, 2009. Archived from the original on November 17, 2011. Retrieved July 5, 2009.
  8. "PepsiCo to test malt-flavored Mountain Dew in some US cities". Reuters. July 13, 2012. Retrieved July 14, 2012.
  9. "History". Archived from the original on May 26, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2009.
  10. "About the School". Archived from the original on August 28, 2009. Retrieved October 5, 2009.
  11. "Johnson City Press".