Nottinghamshire

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Nottinghamshire
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
RegionEast Midlands
OriginHistoric
Time zoneUTC±00:00 (Greenwich Mean Time)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+01:00 (British Summer Time)
Ceremonial county
Area[convert: needs a number]
 • Ranked of 48
 • Ranked of 48
Density[convert: needs a number]
Ethnicity94.1% White
2.5% S. Asian
1.5% Afro-Carib.

Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is a county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, North Lincolnshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. The county town is traditionally Nottingham, at 52°57′17″N, 1°09′29″W, though the council is now based in West Bridgford (at a site facing Nottingham over the River Trent).

The districts of Nottinghamshire are Ashfield, Bassetlaw, Broxtowe, Gedling, Mansfield, Newark and Sherwood, and Rushcliffe. The City of Nottingham was administratively part of Nottinghamshire between 1974 and 1998 but is now a unitary authority, although it remains part of the county.

National and County cricket player Harold Larwood.

Culture[change | change source]

Nottinghamshire contains the ancestral home of the poet Lord Byron, Newstead Abbey, which he sold in 1818. It is now owned by Nottingham City Council and open to the public.

Settlements and communications[change | change source]

The council house and a tram in Nottingham market square.

The traditional county town, and the largest settlement in the historic and ceremonial county boundaries, is Nottingham. The City is now administratively independent, but suburbs including Arnold, Carlton, West Bridgford, Beeston and Stapleford are still within the administrative county and West Bridgford is now home of the county council.

Places of interest[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]