Thapa

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Thapa
Family Name

MeaningWarrior[1]
Region of originKarnali Zone, Nepal[1]
Language of originKhas language[1]
PopularityBehind the Name 
Wikipedia articlesAll pages beginning with Thapa

Thapa (Nepali: थापा; IAST:Thāpā) is a family name or surname used by Nepalese belonging to both Kshetri caste within Khas people of Indo-Aryan group and Magar caste of Sino-Tibetan group.[1] Kshetri/Chhetri Thapas are addressed as Thapa Kajis or elite Thapas while Thapa Magars are addressed as general Magars in Nepal.[2]

Thapa was a title given to warriors in the ancient Khas Kingdom. It is proved many inscriptions in the present day region of Old Khas Kingdom. There were names of Thapa warriors in pillar inscription as:

Be it auspicious. Yasu Thapa, son of Bhimadev, established the herostone in 1256 Saka era.... Be it auspicious. Dhamu Khadga, son of Bhimadev...[1]

The above inscription also proved that Thapas and Khadkas (Khadgas) had same Kshatriya father but their actual clan name was not given.

Thapas has been involved in politics of Nepal for long time. Thapas were prominent military heads in various princely states in ancient Nepal.[3] Thapas led military and civil administration in the unified Kingdom of Nepal after 1806 AD. Bhimsen Thapa of Bagale Thapa clan rose to prominence after the assassination of King Rana Bahadur Shah of Nepal by King's step-brother in 1805 AD. After the event, an investigation was run by Bharadars (Ministers) which caused massacre of 55 senior officers at Bhandarkhal garden by Thapa Kaji (ministers) group making them as most dominant faction in Nepalese politics.[4]

Bhimsen Thapa of powerful Thāpā Khalaka dynasty, the most famous among Thapas

After Bhimsen rose to power, member of another Thapa family, Bada (senior) Kaji Amar Singh Thapa[1] and his family were added to make Thapa Khalak dynasty stronger.[5] Large number of Thapa leaders took part in Anglo-Nepalese War in 1814-16 AD. The immediate family of Bhimsen and Senior Kaji Amar Singh took over all the military commands in that war. Another unrelated warrior Bhakti Thapa also led the war at Deuthal aged 71 and died too.[6] Thapas were out of power after the rise of Rana dynasty who were blood relatives of Thapas. Later Panchayat government of Nepal that began in 1961 AD saw large number of Thapas in the cabinet.[2]

Khas Kshatri Thapa[change | change source]

Khas Thapa or Chhetri/Kshatri Thapa are Khas people of Indo-Aryan group. They are categorized into Kshatriya in Hinduism. They follow Hinduism and are divided by Khas clans and Hindu Gotra system. The clan names of Khas Kshatri Thapas are: Bagale Thapa, Punwar Thapa, Godar Thapa, Lamichhane Thapa, Suyal Thapa, Kalikote Thapa, Hrikshen Thapa, Khulal Thapa, Deoja Thapa, Thakuryal Thapa, Gamle Thapa, Sonal Thapa, and many others.

Bagale Thapa[change | change source]

Prime Minister of Nepal Mathabar Singh Thapa, a nobleman from Bagale Thapa clan

Bagale Thapa is the most prominent clan within Khas Thapa. They fall under Atreya Gotra in Hinduism. The most famous Thapa Khalak dynasty of Prime Minister Bhimsen Thapa in the Nepalese politics belonged to this Bagale Thapa clan. They trace their origin to legendary Khas King Kalu Thapa.

Puwar Thapa[change | change source]

Kamal Thapa, a politician of Nepal from Puwar Thapa clan

Puwar Thapa is also a clan within Khas Thapa. They claim descent from Parmar/Punwar Rajputs of Rajasthan.

Godar Thapa[change | change source]

Godar Thapa clan is also populous Khas Kshatri clan. They belong to Kashyap Gotra in Hinduism.

Magar Thapa[change | change source]

Victoria Crossholder Netra Bahadur Thapa Magar, member of Magar caste

Magar Thapa or Thapa Magar are member of Magar caste which falls under Sino-Tibetan or Tibeto-Burman group. They speak Magar language and follow tradition of Magar caste. They can be found as core soldiers in Gurkha armies around the world.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Adhikary, Surya Mani (1997). The Khasa kingdom: a trans-Himalayan empire of the middle age. Nirala Publications. ISBN 978-81-85693-50-7.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "THAPADOM- Nepali Times". archive.nepalitimes.com.
  3. K.L. Pradhan 2012.
  4. K.L. Pradhan 2012, p. 16.
  5. K.L. Pradhan 2012, p. 26.
  6. http://nepalarmy.mil.np/history.php?page=two

Books[change | change source]