Nepali language

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Nepali
Gorkhali, Khas-kurā
नेपाली/गोरखाली/खस कुरा
Nepali word in devanagri script.png
The word "Nepali" written in Devanagari
Native toNepal
EthnicityKhas people[1]
Native speakers
20 million[2]
Devanagari
Devanagari Braille
Takri (historical)
Signed Nepali
Official status
Official language in
   Nepal
 India (Sikkim, West Bengal)
Regulated byNepal Academy
Language codes
ISO 639-1ne
ISO 639-2nep
ISO 639-3nepinclusive code
Individual codes:
npi – Nepali
dty – Doteli
Glottolognepa1254[3]
nepa1252  duplicate code[4]
Linguasphere59-AAF-d
Nepali language status.png
World map with significant Nepali language speakers
Dark Blue: Main official language,
Light blue: One of the official languages,
Red: Places with significant population or greater than 20% but without official recognition.

The Nepali language is the official language of Nepal. Besides Nepal it is spoken in India, Bhutan and parts of Burma. In the Indian states of Sikkim and West Bengal also it is an official language. This language is also known as Gorkhali Language or Khaskura. It is believed to have originated from the ancient Sanskrit language from which it takes many words. It is written in Devanagari style of writing which is similar to Hindi. It is spoken throughout Nepal and is the mother tongue of more than half of the population. It is also used by the Government of Nepal for all official purposes. In Nepal it is compulsory to study Nepali language as a subject until Grade 10 (High School).

References[change | change source]

  1. Richard Burghart 1984, pp. 118-119.
  2. Nepali at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Nepali at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Doteli at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  3. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Nepali [1]". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  4. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Nepali [2]". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.