List of foods named after people

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A[change | change source]

Dish Named in honour of Main ingredients Notes
Poularde Adelina Patti Adelina Patti Chicken
Pâté de filets d'oie Adolphe Hardy Adolphe-Marie Hardy Goose liver [1]
Woodcock salmis Agnès Sorel Agnès Sorel Woodcock
Big Hearted Al candy bar Al Smith Candy bar
Fillet of Beef Prince Albert Albert, Prince Consort Beef
Poularde Albufera Louis Gabriel Suchet chicken
Albufera Sauce
Alexandertorte Alexander I of Russia
Gâteau Alexandra Alexandra of Denmark chocolate cake [2]
Consommé Alexandra Chicken in a consommé
Lobster Duke Alexis Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia Lobster [1]
Fettuccine Alfredo Alfredo di Lelio Fettuccine, Parmesan, Butter
Consommé Princess Alice Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone Consommé with artichoke hearts and lettuce [3]
Sole Princess Alice Sole
Amundsen's Dessert Roald Amundsen [4]
Omelette André Theuriet André Theuriet omelette, truffles & asparagus
Angela Burdett plum Angela Burdett-Coutts Plum variety
Pommes Anna Anna Deslions sliced potatoes casseroled in butter [5]
Omelette Arnold Bennett Arnold Bennett Omelette, haddock
Oreiller de la Belle Aurore Claudine-Aurore Récamier game birds, veal, pork, truffles, aspic, and much else [6]
Château Ausone wine Ausonius Bordeaux wine

B[change | change source]

Dish Named in honour of Main ingredients Notes
Baco Noir Maurice Baco grape [7]
Baldwin apple Loammi Baldwin Apple variety [8]
Chicken Cardinal la Balue Cardinal Jean la Balue (1421–1491) minister to Louis XI Chicken, crayfish, and mashed potatoes
Bartlett pear Enoch Bartlett Pear variety [9]
Battenberg cake The Princes of Battenberg family colourful cake
Béarnaise sauce Henry IV of France [10]
Béchamel sauce Louis de Béchamel Scalded milk and roux.
Bellini (cocktail) Giovanni Bellini Sparkling wine (e.g. Prosecco) and peach purée
Ham mousseline à la Belmont August Belmont (1816–1890) Ham
Eggs Benedict Lemuel Benedict Eggs, Bacon, Hollandaise sauce, English Muffin [11] or
Commodore E.C. Benedict or
Mrs LeGrand Benedict
[1]
Eggs Benedict XVI Pope Benedict XVI Rye bread and sausage or sauerbraten replace the English muffins and bacon [12]
Eggs Berlioz Hector Berlioz , soft-boiled eggs, croustades, duchesse potatoes, and truffles and mushrooms in a Madeira sauce.
Beyti kebap Beyti Güler roasted lamb fillets wrapped in strips of lamb cutlet fat [13].
Bibb lettuce John B. Bibb Lettuce variety [14].
Oysters Bienville Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville (1680–1767) baked oysters in a shrimp sauce [15]
Bing cherry Ah Bing Cherry variety [16]
Bismarck herring Otto von Bismarck (1815–1898) pickled herring [17]
Bismarcks Berliner Pfannkuchen, so called in Canada and the US
Schlosskäse Bismarck Type of cheese
Oeufs moulés Bizet Georges Bizet Eggs, tongue, artichoke hearts
Consommé Bizet
Sole Bolivar Simón Bolívar
South American revolutionary
Sole
Bonaparte's Ribs Napoleon Bonaparte [18]
Boysenberry Rudolph Boysen loganberry/raspberry/blackberry cross
Brillat-Savarin cheese Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin Type of Cheese [19]
Consommé Brillat-Savarin Chicken consommé, savoury pancakes
Croutes Brillat-Savarin Calves' or lambs' sweetbreads
Oeufs en cocotte Brillat-Savarin Eggs, noodles, asparagus
Flan Brillat-Savarin Scrambled Eggs, truffles
Savarin cake Flour, sugar, eggs, almonds
Timbale Brillat-Savarin Brioche, macaroons, pears, crèmè pâtissière
Hot Brown J. Graham Brown Hot Sandwich
Parson Brown orange Rev. Nathan L. Brown Orange variety [20]
Burbank plum Luther Burbank (1849–1926) Plum variety [21]

C[change | change source]

Dish Named in honour of Main ingredients Notes
Bloody Caesar cocktail Julius Caesar Created by Canadian bartender Walter Chell.
Caesar's mushroom probably named for Julius Caesar Mushroom of southern France is also called the King of Mushrooms
Caesar potato
Caesar salad Hotel Caesar in Tijuana [22]
Carpaccio named for painter Vittore Carpaccio Thinly sliced raw beef. Carpaccio was known for using a red colour which looked like that of raw beef
Caruso sauce Enrico Caruso
Galantine of pheasants Casimir Perier Jean Casimir Perier pheasant Charles Ranhofer named these dishes after this French president.
Palmettes Casimir Perier
Apple Charlotte Queen Charlotte fruite puree a baked dish,
Charlotte Russe Czar Alexander I Bavarian Cream, Sponge fingers An uncooked dish, renamed in honour of Marie-Antoine Carême's employer ("Russe" being the French equivalent of the adjective, "Russian") in the Second Empire. Carême called his creation Charlotte à la parisienne.
Charlotte Corday Charlotte Corday (1768–1793), the assassin of the radical Jean-Paul Marat was paid tribute with an ice cream dessert by Charles Ranhofer of Delmonico's
Chateaubriand Vicomte François René de Chateaubriand (1768–1848) Steak a cut and a recipe named for Chateaubriand, by his chef Montinireil. Probably around 1822 while he was ambassador to England. There is also a kidney dish named for him.
Chiboust cream French pastry chef Chiboust Cream filling Invented by the French pastry chef Chiboust in Paris around 1846, for his Gâteau Saint-Honoré. The filling is also called Saint-Honoré cream.
Choron sauce Alexandre Étienne Choron
Christian IX cheese King Christian IX of Denmark (1818–1906) Caraway-seeded semi-firm Danish cheese.
Chaudfroid of chicken Clara Morris Clara Morris (1848–1925) Chicken Charles Ranhofer named this dish for the popular 19th-century American actress. When the taste in drama changed in the 1890s and she turned to writing.
Clementines Père Clément Rodier Type of citrus fruit
Cleopatra Mandarin orange presumably, Cleopatra VII (69–30 BC), fruits
Cleopatra apple
Peach pudding à la Cleveland Grover Cleveland Peaches Charles Ranhofer seemed to feel presidents deserved desserts named after them, like Escoffier did ladies, even if Cleveland was reputed to not much like French food.
Veuve Clicquot Barbe-Nicole Ponsardin Champagne brand Ponsardin was the widow (French: veuve) of François Clicquot.
Cobb Salad Robert H. Cobb Cobb owned the Hollywood Brown Derby restaurant, and is said to have invented this as a late-night snack for himself in 1936–1937.
Scrambled eggs à la Columbus Christopher Columbus eggs ham, blood pudding and beef brains
Cox's Orange Pippin Richard Cox (1777–1845) Apple variety Named after its developer in Buckinghamshire
Cumberland Sauce Ernst August of Hanover, 3rd Duke of Cumberland Sauce for game
Lady Curzon Soup Lady Curzon, née Mary Victoria Leiter (1870–1906) turtle soup with sherry Allegedly, she directed the inclusion of sherry when a teetotalling guest prevented the usual serving of alcohol at a dinner, around 1905. Lady Curzon was the daughter of Chicago businessman Levi Z. Leiter, who co-founded the original department store now called Marshall Field.

D[change | change source]

Dish Named in honour of Main ingredients Notes
Dartois François-Victor-Armand Dartois (1780–1867) Several versions of this pastry, some sweet, some savoury Dartois was once very well-known author of French vaudeville plays
Shrimp DeJonghe The DeJonghe Brothers shrimp and garlic casserole created at DeJonghe's Hotel, 1n early-20th-century Chicago, owned by brothers from Belgium.
Sirloin of beef à la de Lesseps Ferdinand de Lesseps Beef Ranhofer named this beef dish after de Lessep, following a dinner in his honour. A banana dessert from the same dinner was afterward termed "à la Panama." ,probably well before de Lesseps' 1889 bankruptcy scandal.
Delmonico steak Delmonico's Restaurant Steak Two of the many dishes named after the restaurant in the United States, or the brothers who owned it.
Lobster à la Delmonico Lobster
Chicken Demidoff Prince Anatole Demidoff (1813–1870) Chicken, elaboratedly stuffed, smothered, tied up and garnished There are two chicken dishes named after him, and the Demidoff name is also applied to dishes of rissoles and red snapper.
Veal pie à la Dickens
Charles Dickens (1812–1870) Veal Two dishes from Delmonico’s menu, probably from around the time Dickens was making his second visit to New York in 1867.
Beet fritters à la Dickens Beetroot
Doboschtorte or Dobostorta Josef Dobos multi-layered chocolate torte Created by Josef Dobos, a well-known Hungarian pastry chef, in Budapest or Vienna.
Dongpo's pork Su Dongpo (1037–1101), poet squares of pork, half lean meat and half fat, pan-fried then braised.
Potage à la Du Barry Madame du Barry Cauliflower, potato, consommé, cream Several dishes cauliflower based dishes arenamed for her. It was said to be a reference to her elaborate powdered wigs.
Salade Du Barry Cauliflower, radishes
Sole Dubois Urbain Dubois 19th-century French chef Sole (see Veal Prince Orloff)
Sole Dugléré Adolphe Dugléré (1805–1884) Sole Dugléré, started as a student of Antonin Carême, when he became head chef at the famed Café Anglais in Paris in 1866, he began creating and naming many well-known dishes. Several fish dishes bear his own name.
Salad à la Dumas Alexandre Dumas, père Various salads Apparently a favourite of
Charles Ranhofer
Mushrooms à la Dumas
Stewed Woodcock à la Dumas
Timbale à la Dumas
Duxelles Nicolas Chalon du Blé, marquis d'Uxelles a mushroom-based sauce or garnish D’Uxelles employed French chef François Pierre La Varenne (1615–1678), who created the dish. A variety of dishes use this name.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Created by Charles Ranhofer
  2. Soup, sole, chicken, quail, and various meat dishes are also named after her.
  3. Created by Escoffier
  4. Created by his friends not long before he died in an Arctic plane crash
  5. Created by Adolphe Dugléré at his Café Anglais. "Potatoes Annette" is a version of Potatoes Anna, with the potatoes julienned instead of in rounds
  6. [1] The mother of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin also has a lobster dish named after her but this elaborate game pie was one of her son's favorite dishes.
  7. Hybrid grape, named after its breeder
  8. Found by Baldwin, a commander of militia at the Battle of Lexington, while working as a surveyor and engineer on the Middlesex Canal in Massachusetts between 1784 and 1793
  9. Accidentally renaming of the English Williams pear by Massachusetts nurseryman Bartlett. Williams was a 17th-century English horticulturist.
  10. But often thought to indicate the region of Béarn
  11. Oscar Tschirky at the Waldorf-Astoria
  12. Eggs Benedict XVI
  13. "Three Renowned Turkish Restaurants: Beyti Meat Restaurant". Skylife - Turkish Airlines magazine (12): 1–4. 2000. http://www.thy.com/en-INT/skylife/archive/en/2000_12/konu4.htm#1.
  14. Named after a mid-19th-century amateur horticulturist of Frankfort, Kentucky
  15. A New Orleans dish was named for French governor of Louisiana and founder of New Orleans (1718).
  16. Developed around 1875 bySeth Luelling (or Lewelling), an Oregon horticulturist. Named after his Manchurian foreman Bing
  17. The first Chancellor of the German Empire. This is just a few of the many foods named after him. The Black Velvet Cocktail is also sometime called a Bismarck.
  18. an early-19th-century English sweet
  19. Brillat-Savarin was author of The Physiology of Taste, in which he spoke about cuisine as a science. These are only a few of the dishes named after him
  20. Brown was a 19th-century Florida minister and orange grower who, developed what was to become the leading commercial orange of the time in the U.S.
  21. Burbank was an American horticulturist, who bred many new varieties of plants, including this and the Russet Burbank potato.
  22. Caesar Cardini (1896–1956) or one of his associates created this salad at the restaurant he owned