Ozone

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Ozone
Ozone-1,3-dipole.png
Ozone-CRC-MW-3D-vdW.png
Ozone-CRC-MW-3D-balls.png
Ozone-elpot-3D-vdW.png
IUPAC name Trioxygen
Identifiers
CAS number 10028-15-6
PubChem 24823
EC number 233-069-2
MeSH Ozone
ChEBI CHEBI:25812
RTECS number RS8225000
SMILES o:o:o
Gmelin Reference 1101
Properties
Molecular formula O3
Molar mass 47.98 g mol-1
Appearance Pale, blue gas
Density 0.002144 g cm-3 (at 0 °C)
Melting point

-192 °C, 81 K, -314 °F

Boiling point

-112 °C, 161 K, -170 °F

Solubility in water 1.05 g dm-3 (at 0 °C)
Refractive index (nD) 1.2226 (liquid)
Structure
Space group C2v
Coordination
geometry
Digonal
Molecular shape Dihedral
Hybridisation sp2 for O1
Dipole moment 0.53 D
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
142.67 kJ mol−1
Standard molar
entropy
So298
238.92 J K−1 mol−1
Hazards
EU classification Oxidising agent O
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

0
4
4
OX
Related compounds
Related compounds Sulfur dioxide

Thiozone

Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Ozone is a chemical with the symbol O3. This means one molecule of ozone is made of 3 oxygen atoms. Ozone is also called trioxygen. Ozone makes up only 0.6 parts per million (ppm) of the atmosphere .

Ozone is important to planet Earth. There is a portion of the stratosphere with a high concentration of ozone, called the ozone layer. The ozone layer filters out damaging ultraviolet radiation from the Sun,[1] like a kind of sun screen. Without this ozone layer things would not have been able to live on the surface of our planet.

However, ozone is toxic to animals and plants above concentrations of about 0.1 ppm. In humans, it can cause nasal and throat irritation, and nausea.[2] Extended exposure can cause lung oedema.[2] 0.100 ppm is the maximum allowable limit for industrial, public, or occupied spaces in England, Japan, France, the Netherlands and Germany.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Stratospheric ozone". Ministry for the Environment (New Zealand). 2013-07-18. https://www.mfe.govt.nz/environmental-reporting/atmosphere/levels-stratospheric-ozone-indicator/report-card-2012.html. Retrieved 2014-03-03.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Ozone Safety Limits". Understanding Ozone. http://www.understandingozone.com/limits.asp. Retrieved 2013-11-21.