Ukrainian language

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Ukrainian
Українська мова Ukrayins'ka mova
Native to Ukraine
Ethnicity Ukrainians
Native speakers 35-37 million  (2009)[1][2]
Language family
Early forms:
Old East Slavic
  • Ukrainian
Writing system Cyrillic (Ukrainian alphabet)
Ukrainian Braille
Official status
Official language in
Recognised minority language in
Regulated by National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine: Institute for the Ukrainian Language, Ukrainian language-informatical fund, Potebnya Institute of Language Studies
Language codes
ISO 639-1 uk
ISO 639-2 ukr
ISO 639-3 ukr
Linguasphere 53-AAA-ed < 53-AAA-e
(varieties: 53-AAA-eda to 53-AAA-edq)
Percentage of people in Ukrainian regions who speak Ukrainian as their native language (for 2001)

The Ukrainian language (Ukrainian: українська (мова), transliteration: ukrajins'ka mova) is an Eastern Slavic language. This language is a part of the Indo-European language family.

Ukrainian is the second most spoken Slavic language. It is the official language of Ukraine. There are 37 million speakers in Ukraine. Most of them are native speakers. All over the world there are more than 50 million speakers.

The Ukrainian language is written with Cyrillic letters.

Some words are similar to the Polish language.

Alphabet[change | edit source]

The Ukrainian alphabet with transliteration and German transcription:

Capital letter(HTML-Entity) Small letter(HTML-Entity) Academic
transliteration
English
transcription
German
transcription
А (&#1040;) а (&#1072;) A a A a A a
Б (&#1041;) б (&#1073;) B b B b B b
В (&#1042;) в (&#1074;) V v V v W w
Г (&#1043;) г (&#1075;) H h H h H h
Ґ (&#1168;) ґ (&#1169;) G g G g G g
Д (&#1044;) д (&#1076;) D d D d D d
Е (&#1045;) е (&#1077;) E e E e E e
Є (&#1028;) є (&#1108;) Je je Ye ye Je je
Ж (&#1046;) ж (&#1078;) Ž ž Zh zh Sch (Sh) sch (sh)
З (&#1047;) з (&#1079;) Z z Z z S s
И (&#1048;) и (&#1080;) Y y Y y Y y
І (&#1030;) і (&#1110;) I i I i I i
Ї (&#1031;) ї (&#1111;) Ji ji Yi yi Ji ji
Й (&#1049;) й (&#1081;) J j 1 Y y J j
К (&#1050;) к (&#1082;) K k K k (instead ks x) K k (instead ks x)
Л (&#1051;) л (&#1083;) L l L l L l
М (&#1052;) м (&#1084;) M m M m M m
Н (&#1053;) н (&#1085;) N n N n N n
О (&#1054;) о (&#1086;) O o O o O o
П (&#1055;) п (&#1087;) P p P p P p
Р (&#1056;) р (&#1088;) R r R r R r
С (&#1057;) с (&#1089;) S s S s S s (between vowels ss)
Т (&#1058;) т (&#1090;) T t T t T t
У (&#1059;) у (&#1091;) U u U u U u
Ф (&#1060;) ф (&#1092;) F f F f F f
Х (&#1061;) х (&#1093;) Ch ch Kh, kh Ch ch
Ц (&#1062;) ц (&#1094;) C c Ts ts Z z
Ч (&#1063;) ч (&#1095;) Č č Ch ch Tsch tsch
Ш (&#1064;) ш (&#1096;) Š š Sh sh Sch sch
Щ (&#1065;) щ (&#1097;) Šč šč Shch shch Schtsch schtsch (Stsch stsch)
Ь (&#1068;) ь (&#1100;) ’ (apostrophe) before vowel j 2 ’ (apostrophe) before vowel y (Soft sign) (–) bzw. j
Ю (&#1070;) ю (&#1102;) Ju Ju Yu yu Ju ju
Я (&#1071;) я (&#1103;) Ja ja Ya ya Ja ja
’ (apostrophe)3 (–) (–)

Notes[change | edit source]

1only before o
2only after consonants; a capital letter does not exist; the soft sign ь is not a letter representing a sound, but modifies the sound of the preceding letter, indicating palatalisation ('softening').
3an apostrophe (’) is used to mark de-palatalization of the preceding consonant.

References[change | edit source]