Game of Thrones

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Game of Thrones
Logo of Game of Thrones
Genre
Created by
Based onA Song of Ice and Fire
by George R. R. Martin
Starring (See full cast list)
Theme music composerRamin Djawadi
Opening theme"Main Title"
Composer(s)Ramin Djawadi
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons8
No. of episodes73 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s)
Production location(s)
Running time50–82 minutes
Production company(s)
DistributorWarner Bros. Television Studios
Release
Original networkHBO
Picture formatHDTV 1080i
Audio formatDolby Digital 5.1
Original releaseApril 17, 2011 (2011-04-17) –
May 19, 2019 (2019-05-19)
Chronology
Related shows
Other websites
Website
Production website

Game of Thrones is an American fantasy drama television series, based on George R. R. Martin's book series A Song of Ice and Fire. The first episode was shown on April 17, 2011 on Home Box Office. There are eight seasons in total as of 2019. The first season was nominated for thirteen Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Drama Series and won two of them. The series focuses on various kings and queens in two continents called Westeros and Essos. Many of the successors to the throne fight for power. The series is praised for human sexuality and story line.[5]

Plot[change | change source]

The plot revolves around two continents namely, Westeros (the western continent) and Essos (the eastern continent). Noble families of Westeros fight amongst themselves to gain the Iron Throne. And, meanwhile an old enemy which has been dormant for ages is rising again.

Cast[change | change source]

Actor/Actress Character Seasons
Sean Bean Eddard "Ned" Stark 1
Mark Addy Robert Baratheon 1
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau Jaime Lannister[6] 1 - 8
Michelle Fairley Catelyn Stark 1 - 3
Lena Headey Cersei Lannister[6] 1 - 8
Emilia Clarke Daenerys Targaryen[6] 1 - 8
Iain Glen Jorah Mormont[7] 1 - 8
Aidan Gillen Petyr "Littlefinger" Baelish 1 - 7
Harry Lloyd Viserys Targaryen 1
Kit Harington Jon Snow[6] 1 - 8
Sophie Turner Sansa Stark[8] 1 - 8
Maisie Williams Arya Stark[9] 1 - 8
Richard Madden Robb Stark 1 - 3
Alfie Allen Theon Greyjoy 1 - 8
Isaac Hempstead Wright Bran Stark[10] 1 - 4, 6 - 8
Jack Gleeson Joffrey Baratheon 1 - 4
Rory McCann Sandor "The Hound" Clegane[11] 1 - 4, 6 - 8
Peter Dinklage Tyrion Lannister[6] 1 - 8
Jason Momoa Khal Drogo 1 - 2
Charles Dance Tywin Lannister 1 - 4
Liam Cunningham Davos Seaworth[12] 2 - 8
John Bradley Samwell Tarly[13] 1 - 8
Natalie Dormer Margaery Tyrell 2 - 6
Stephen Dillane Stannis Baratheon 2 - 5
Carice van Houten Melisandre 2 - 8
James Cosmo Jeor Mormont 1 - 3
Jerome Flynn Bronn 1 - 8
Conleth Hill Varys 1 - 8
Sibel Kekilli Shae 2 - 4
Rose Leslie Ygritte 2 - 4
Oona Chaplin Talisa Maegyr 2 - 3
Joe Dempsie Gendry 1 - 3, 7 - 8
Kristofer Hivju Tormund Giantsbane 3 - 8
Hannah Murray Gilly 3 - 8
Gwendoline Christie Brienne of Tarth 2 - 8
Iwan Rheon Ramsay Bolton 3 - 6
Indira Varma Ellaria Sand 4 - 7
Michiel Huisman Daario Naharis 3 - 6
Nathalie Emmanuel Missandei[14] 2 - 8
Tom Wlaschiha Jaqen H'ghar 1 - 2, 5 - 6
Dean-Charles Chapman Tommen Baratheon 1 - 2, 4 - 6
Michael McElhatton Roose Bolton 1 - 6
Jonathan Pryce The High Sparrow 5 - 6

Books[change | change source]

  1. A Game Of Thrones
  2. A Clash Of Kings
  3. A Storm of Swords
  4. A Feast For The Crows

References[change | change source]

  1. Noah Harari, Yuval (May 24, 2019). "Game of Thrones: A Battle of Reality Versus Fantasy". Wired. Archived from the original on June 3, 2019. Retrieved May 19, 2020.
  2. Alsop, Elizabeth (July 8, 2015). "The Unbearable Darkness of Prestige Television". The Atlantic. Emerson Collective. Archived from the original on July 10, 2015. Retrieved May 19, 2020. From the bro-style bloviating (or, broviating) of True Detective's first season, to the ominous proclaiming that punctuates the general whoring and slaying of Game of Thrones, to the unceasing climatological and psychological punishments meted out to the cast of The Killing, it seems as though some of the most celebrated recent examples of serial drama have elected self-seriousness as their default tone.
  3. Arp, Robert (2017). J. Silverman, Eric (ed.). The Ultimate Game of Thrones and Philosophy. Open Court Publishing Company. ISBN 9780812699555. Archived from the original on May 26, 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020. Like Game of Thrones, the action in those ancient tragedies centered on the stories of four ruling dynasties: House Atreus of Mycenae, House Cadmus in Thebes, House Erichthonius in Athens, and House Minos in Crete.
  4. Marcotte, Amanda (June 9, 2015). "Don't Be So Shocked by the Deaths on Game of Thrones: The Show Is a Classical Tragedy". Slate. The Slate Group. Archived from the original on January 23, 2019. Retrieved May 19, 2020. But while Game of Thrones is in part a rebuttal to traditional fantasy fiction, I'd argue that it's become clear—after five books in A Song of Ice and Fire and five seasons of the TV series—that Martin and showrunners D.B. Weiss and David Benioff are actually playing with a format that isn't so revolutionary at all: They're reviving and updating the classical tragedy as a narrative form.
  5. Ferreday, Debra. "Game of Thrones, rape culture and feminist fandom." Australian Feminist Studies 30.83 (2015): 21-36.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 Goldberg, Lesley (June 21, 2016). "'Game of Thrones' Stars Score Hefty Pay Raises for Season 8". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  7. "Iain Glen confirms readthrough date". Youtube. October 5, 2017.
  8. Thompson, Avery (February 15, 2017). "Sophie Turner Drops Massive Spoiler About Sansa Stark's Fate In Season 8". Archived from the original on October 2, 2017. Retrieved January 4, 2018.
  9. "Maisie Williams Thinks Arya Went Hunting for Trouble This Season".
  10. Bradley, Bill (August 30, 2017). "'Game Of Thrones' Actor Says Cut Scene Would've Explained Confusing Finale Moment". Huffington Post. Retrieved September 1, 2017.
  11. "Rory McCann says he's already training for Clegane Bowl". Huffington Post.
  12. "Liam Cunningham (Davos) talks about the filming schedule for Game of Thrones Season 8". January 10, 2017.
  13. "Bradley confirms return". August 29, 2017.
  14. Shepherd, Jack (October 24, 2017). "Game of Thrones season 8 filming looks to be underway". The Independent. Retrieved October 24, 2017.

Other websites[change | change source]