Mike Nichols

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Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols Funny Face.jpg
Nichols in 2010
Born Mikhail Igor Peschkowsky
(1931-11-06)November 6, 1931
Berlin, Weimar Germany
Died November 19, 2014(2014-11-19) (aged 83)
New York City, U.S.
Occupation Movie director, theatrical director, comedian
Years active 1955–2014
Spouse(s) Patricia Scott
(m. 1957–1960, divorced)
Margo Callas
(m. 1963–1974, divorced; 1 child)
Annabel Davis-Goff
(1975–1986, divorced; 2 children)
Diane Sawyer
(m. 1988–2014; his death)
Academy Awards
Best Director
1968 The Graduate
Emmy Awards
Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special
2001 Wit
2004 Angels in America
Outstanding Miniseries
2004 Angels in America
Outstanding Made for Television Movie
2001 Wit
Tony Awards
Best Direction of a Play
1964 Barefoot in the Park
1965 The Odd Couple
1968 Plaza Suite
1972 The Prisoner of Second Avenue
1984 The Real Thing
2012 Death of a Salesman
Best Direction of a Musical
2005 Spamalot
Best Musical
1977 Annie
Best Play
1984 The Real Thing
Golden Globe Awards
Best Director
1968 The Graduate
AFI Awards
AFI Life Achievement Award
2010
Grammy Awards
Best Comedy Album
1961 An Evening with Mike Nichols and Elaine May

Mike Nichols (born Mikhail Igor Peschkowsky; November 6, 1931 – November 19, 2014) was an American television, stage and movie director, writer, producer and comedian. He was half of the comedy duo Nichols and May, along with Elaine May. In 1968 he won the Academy Award for Best Director for the movie The Graduate. His other movies include Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Catch-22, Carnal Knowledge, Silkwood, Working Girl, The Birdcage, Closer, Charlie Wilson's War (his final movie), and the TV mini-series Angels in America. He also staged the original theatrical productions of Barefoot in the Park, Luv, The Odd Couple and Spamalot.

Nichols won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award. His other honors included the Lincoln Center Gala Tribute in 1999, the National Medal of Arts in 2001,[1] the Kennedy Center Honors in 2003 and the AFI Life Achievement Award in 2010.

Nichols died suddenly from a heart attack on November 19, 2014, at his home in Manhattan.[2][3]

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