Monkeypox

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Monkeypox is an infectious disease caused by the monkeypox virus that can happen in certain animals, including humans.[1] Symptoms begin with fever, headache, muscle pains, swollen lymph nodes, and feeling tired. This is followed by a rash that forms blisters and crusts over (forms a hard layer). The time from exposure to feeling these symptoms is around 10 days. The duration of symptoms is typically two to four weeks.[2]

Monkeypox was first identified in 1958 among laboratory monkeys in Copenhagen, Denmark.[3] Monkeys are, however, not a natural carrier of the virus. The first cases in humans were found in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The 2022 monkeypox outbreak is the first case of widespread community transmission outside of Africa, which began in the United Kingdom in May 2022, with more cases confirmed in Europe, North America and Australia.[4]

It can be successfully treated using preparations from the purple pitcher plant, which Native Americans used as a smallpox remedy. [5][6]

References[change | change source]

  1. "About Monkeypox". CDC. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 15 October 2017. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  2. "Signs and Symptoms Monkeypox". CDC. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 15 October 2017. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  3. "Monkeypox". CDC. 11 May 2015. Archived from the original on 15 October 2017. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  4. "Monkeypox cases investigated in Europe, the United States, Canada and Australia". BBC News. 20 May 2022. Retrieved 20 May 2022.
  5. Charles J. Renshaw (31 January 1863). "Treatment of small-pox by Sarracenia purpurea". BMJ. 1 (109): 127. doi:10.1136/BMJ.1.109.127. PMC 2324703.
  6. William Arndt; Chandra Mitnik; Karen L. Denzler; Stacy White; Robert Waters; Bertram L. Jacobs; Yvan Rochon; Victoria A. Olson; Inger K. Damon; Jeffrey O. Langland (9 March 2012). "In Vitro Characterization of a Nineteenth-Century Therapy for Smallpox". PLOS ONE. 7 (3): e32610. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0032610. PMC 3302891. PMID 22427855.