Buenos Aires

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Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires
From top (left to right): skyline of the city at dusk, the National Congress, the Woman's Bridge in Puerto Madero, Tango dancers in San Telmo, the Pink House, the Metropolitan Cathedral, Cabildo, the Obelisk, Colón Theatre, La Recoleta Cemetery, the Planetarium in the Palermo Woods, and Caminito in La Boca.
From top (left to right): skyline of the city at dusk, the National Congress, the Woman's Bridge in Puerto Madero, Tango dancers in San Telmo, the Pink House, the Metropolitan Cathedral, Cabildo, the Obelisk, Colón Theatre, La Recoleta Cemetery, the Planetarium in the Palermo Woods, and Caminito in La Boca.
Flag of Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Flag
Coat of arms of Autonomous City of Buenos Aires
Coat of arms
Nickname(s): 

The Queen of El Plata, The South American Paris, The Capital of Tango, The city of books, The Paris of the Pampas,[1] The Cultural Capital of Latin America[2]
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Coordinates: 34°36′12″S 58°22′54″W / 34.60333°S 58.38167°W / -34.60333; -58.38167Coordinates: 34°36′12″S 58°22′54″W / 34.60333°S 58.38167°W / -34.60333; -58.38167
CountryArgentina
Established1536, 1580
Government
 • TypeAutonomous city
 • Chief of GovernmentHoracio Rodríguez Larreta
Area
 • Autonomous City203 km2 (78.5 sq mi)
 • Land203 km2 (78.5 sq mi)
 • Metro
4,758 km2 (1,837 sq mi)
Elevation
25 m (82 ft)
Population
(2010 census.)[3]
 • Autonomous City2,890,151
 • Rank4th
 • Density14,000/km2 (37,000/sq mi)
 • Metro
12,801,364
Demonym(s)porteño (m), porteña (f)
Time zoneUTC−3 (ART)
Area code(s)011
HDI (2010)0.953 – Very High[4][not in the source given]
Websitewww.buenosaires.gob.ar (Spanish) bue.gov.ar (English)
Catalinas Norte Towers

Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city in the South American country of Argentina.

Buenos Aires city is also known as Capital Federal to differentiate the city from the Buenos Aires Province.

Until 1994 Buenos Aires city was under the presidential government, but after a constitutional reform in that year, the city became self-governed, allowing citizens to elect their city authorities.

Population[change | change source]

Buenos Aires has a population of 3,040,000 inhabitants. Spanish is the main language, but English is widely spoken and understood well. Italian is also widespread.

Weather[change | change source]

Buenos Aires has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa in the Koeppen climate classification). The average temperature is 17 °C. During the 20th century the temperature went up because of the urbanization. Rainfall is 1222.6 mm. per year. Summers are hot and humid. Winters are mild, the highest medium temperature is 13.7 °C during this season. Temperature rarely reaches 0 °C or below. Fog is frequent.

Climate data for Buenos Aires Central Observatory, located in Villa Ortúzar (1981–2010, extremes 1906–present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 43.3
(109.9)
38.7
(101.7)
37.9
(100.2)
36.0
(96.8)
31.6
(88.9)
28.5
(83.3)
30.2
(86.4)
34.4
(93.9)
35.3
(95.5)
35.6
(96.1)
36.8
(98.2)
40.5
(104.9)
43.3
(109.9)
Average high °C (°F) 30.1
(86.2)
28.6
(83.5)
26.8
(80.2)
22.9
(73.2)
19.3
(66.7)
16.0
(60.8)
15.4
(59.7)
17.7
(63.9)
19.3
(66.7)
22.6
(72.7)
25.6
(78.1)
28.5
(83.3)
22.7
(72.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) 24.9
(76.8)
23.6
(74.5)
21.9
(71.4)
17.9
(64.2)
14.5
(58.1)
11.7
(53.1)
11.0
(51.8)
12.8
(55.0)
14.6
(58.3)
17.8
(64.0)
20.7
(69.3)
23.3
(73.9)
17.9
(64.2)
Average low °C (°F) 20.1
(68.2)
19.3
(66.7)
17.7
(63.9)
13.8
(56.8)
10.7
(51.3)
8.0
(46.4)
7.4
(45.3)
8.8
(47.8)
10.3
(50.5)
13.3
(55.9)
15.9
(60.6)
18.4
(65.1)
13.6
(56.5)
Record low °C (°F) 5.9
(42.6)
4.2
(39.6)
2.8
(37.0)
−2.3
(27.9)
−4
(25)
−5.3
(22.5)
−5.4
(22.3)
−4
(25)
−2.4
(27.7)
−2
(28)
1.6
(34.9)
3.7
(38.7)
−5.4
(22.3)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 138.8
(5.46)
127.1
(5.00)
140.1
(5.52)
119.0
(4.69)
92.3
(3.63)
58.8
(2.31)
60.6
(2.39)
64.2
(2.53)
72.0
(2.83)
127.2
(5.01)
117.3
(4.62)
118.9
(4.68)
1,236.3
(48.67)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.1 mm) 9 8 9 9 7 7 7 7 7 10 10 9 99
Average relative humidity (%) 64 68 72 76 77 79 79 74 70 69 66 63 71
Source #1: Servicio Meteorológico Nacional[5]
Source #2: NOAA (humidity, 1961–1990)[6]

Neighborhoods[change | change source]

Buenos Aires is divided into 48 neighborhoods. Most populated areas are:

  • Palermo: Located in the northeast of the city, it also is the largest neighborhood in Buenos Aires. Some parts of Palermo are highly touristic: Bosques de Palermo (Palermo Woods), Palermo Soho, Palermo Hollywood
  • Caballito: This mostly residential neighborhood is located in the geographical centre of the city.
  • Recoleta: Recoleta is one of the most wealthy neighborhoods in Buenos Aires. Recoleta Cemetery is located there.

Tourism[change | change source]

Buenos Aires is the most visited city in South America.[7] The most touristic areas are the historical center, Palermo, Recoleta and San Telmo.

  • Historical Center / Plaza de Mayo: It is the historical place of the foundation of the city. On Plaza de Mayo, many interesting buildings can be found : Cabildo (where the colonial government was), Cathedral, Casa Rosada (current Government Palace).
  • San Telmo is one of the most ancient neighborhoods in Buenos Aires. It used to be a very expensive area. But in the 18th Century, an epidemic made people move to Recoleta area, farther from the river.
  • Recoleta: In this neighborhood, there are many beautiful Palaces from the 19th Century. Tourists also visit Recoleta Cemetery where many political figures are buried. One famous person buried in Recoleta Cemetery is political woman Eva Perón.
  • Palermo: Palermo is divided in several sub-areas. Palermo Soho is full of designers and clothing shops. Palermo Hollywood is the gastronomical heart of Buenos Aires.
  • Boedo: Classical and very interesting tango and literature historical district. A remarkable episode in the Argentine literature's history is the social and literary dialogue between the Florida Group, named this way because its members used to meet up at the Richmond Cafeteria at Florida street and publish their work in the Martin Fierro magazine, like Jorge Luis Borges, Leopoldo Marechal, Antonio Berni (artist), among others, versus the Boedo Group of Roberto Arlt, Manzi and other writers and artists. They used to meet together at the Japanese Cafe and published their works with the Editorial Claridad, with both the cafe and the publisher located at the Boedo Avenue.

Wikimania[change | change source]

The fifth Wikimania was hosted in this city in 2009.

References[change | change source]

  1. Owens, Mitchell. "Travel+Leisure: Buenos Aires Reinventing Itself". Travelandleisure.com. Retrieved 2 May 2012.
  2. "Sitio oficial de turismo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires". Bue.gov.ar. Retrieved 2 May 2012.
  3. "Argentina: Censo2010". Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  4. "Reports | National Reports | Latin America and the Caribbean | Argentina | Human Development Reports (HDR) | United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)". Hdr.undp.org. Retrieved 2013-03-12.
  5. "Caracteristicas Climaticas de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires" (in Spanish). Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  6. "Buenos Aires Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 3 January 2016.
  7. http://www.infobae.com/2012/06/14/1052348-mexico-df-buenos-aires-y-san-pablo-los-destinos-turisticos-favoritos

Other websites[change | change source]

Avenida de Mayo avenue.

Online newspapers[change | change source]

Provinces of Argentina Flag of Argentina
Buenos Aires | Buenos Aires Province | Catamarca | Chaco | Chubut | Córdoba | Corrientes | Entre Ríos | Formosa | Jujuy | La Pampa | La Rioja | Mendoza | Misiones | Neuquen | Río Negro | Salta | San Juan | San Luis | Santa Cruz | Santa Fe | Santiago del Estero | Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands | Tucumán