Joseph Muscat

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Joseph Muscat

Joseph muscat 2018 cropped.jpg
13th Prime Minister of Malta
In office
March 11, 2013 – January 13, 2020
PresidentGeorge Abela
Marie Louise Coleiro Preca
George Vella
DeputyLouis Grech
Chris Fearne
Preceded byLawrence Gonzi
Succeeded byRobert Abela
13th Chairperson-in-office of the Commonwealth of Nations
In office
November 27, 2015 – April 19, 2018
HeadElizabeth II
Preceded byMaithripala Sirisena
Succeeded byTheresa May
Personal details
Born (1974-01-22) 22 January 1974 (age 45)
Pietà, State of Malta
Political partyLabour Party
Spouse(s)Michelle Tanti
Children2
Alma materUniversity of Malta
University of Bristol
WebsiteJoseph Muscat

Joseph Muscat (born January 22, 1974) is a Maltese politician. He was Prime Minister of Malta from 2013 through 2020.[1] He is also the Leader of the Partit Laburista (PL) since June 2008.[2] Muscat was re-elected as Prime Minister in 2017.[3]

He was a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) from 2004 to 2008.[4] He was Leader of the Opposition from October 2008 to March 2013.[5]

He has been seen as a controversial politician due to broken promises and corruption.[6] His cabinet has been linked to the murder of journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia.[7]

In December 2019, Muscat announced he would resign on January 12, 2020.[8] He resigned on January 13, 2020.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Joseph Muscat crowned Labour leader". timesofmalta.com. 2008-06-08. Archived from the original on 2015-11-27. Retrieved 2015-11-26. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (help)
  2. "Joseph Muscat sworn in, goes to Castille, as huge crowd celebrates". timesofmalta.com. 2013-03-11. Archived from the original on 2015-11-27. Retrieved 2015-11-26. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (help)
  3. "General Election". Archived from the original on 2017-07-31. Retrieved 2017-06-22. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (help)
  4. "Joseph Muscat". europarl.europa.eu. Archived from the original on 2016-04-19. Retrieved 2017-06-11. Unknown parameter |dead-url= ignored (help)
  5. "Parlament ta' Malta". Archived from the original on 2017-02-26. Retrieved 2017-06-11. Unknown parameter |dead-url= ignored (help)
  6. Cooper, Harry (2017-04-26). "Corruption allegations threaten to wreck Muscat's premiership". politico.eu. Archived from the original on 2017-06-06. Retrieved 2017-06-11.
  7. Reuters
  8. Grech, Herman. "Joseph Muscat expected to step down imminently". Times of Malta (29/11/19). Retrieved 29 November 2019.