Pete Carroll

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Pete Carroll
2008-1018-007-PeteCarroll.jpg
Pete Carroll talking to a pro scout before a game.
Personal information
Date of birth (1951-09-15) September 15, 1951 (age 66)
Place of birth San Francisco, California
Career information
Position(s) Head Coach
College Pacific
Career highlights
Awards See Below
Head coaching record
Regular season 47–49
Postseason 2–3
Career record NCAA: 83–19*[1]
Bowl Games: 6–2*[2]
Stats
Coaching stats Pro Football Reference
Coaching stats DatabaseFootball
Team(s) as a player
1969–1970
1971–1972
Marin
Pacific
Team(s) as a coach/administrator
1978 
1979 
1980–1982 
1983 
1984 
1985–1989 
1990–1993 
1994 
1995–1996 
1997–1999 
2001–2009 
2010–present 
Iowa State (SC)
Ohio State (SC)
North Carolina State (DC)
Pacific (OC)
Buffalo Bills (DB)
Minnesota Vikings (DB)
New York Jets (DC)
New York Jets  
San Francisco 49ers (DC)
New England Patriots  
USC  
Seattle Seahawks  

Peter Clay Carroll (born September 15, 1951, in San Francisco, California) is the head coach and of the Seattle Seahawks, a National Football League team. He used to coach for the New York Jets, New England Patriots and the University of Southern California football team.

In his time at USC, the Trojans went to two BCS Bowl games, winning the National Championship in 2004 and winning the Pacific-10 Conference football title seven years in a row from 2002 to 2008. The 2004 BCS title was taken away from the team in 2010, but USC kept its 2003 and 2004 AP National Championships.[3]

Early life[change | change source]

Carroll went to Redwood High School in Larkspur, California. Carroll played in three sports: football (playing quarterback, wide receiver and defensive back), basketball and baseball. Carroll won the school's Athlete of the Year award in 1969.[4]

College[change | change source]

After high school, Carroll went to junior college (a two-year college) at College of Marin, where he played football for two years before changing schools to the University of the Pacific.[5] At Pacific, Carroll played the free safety position for two years.[5]

After graduation, Carroll tried out for the Honolulu Hawaiians of the World Football League, but did not make the team because of shoulder problems.[6] To make money, he found a job selling roofing materials in the Bay Area, but he found he was not good at it and soon moved on; it would be his only non-football-related job.

Head coaching record[change | change source]

National Football League[change | change source]

Team Year Regular season Postseason
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
NYJ 1994 6 10 0 .375 5th in AFC East
NYJ total 6 10 0 .375
NE 1997 10 6 0 .625 1st in AFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to Pittsburgh Steelers in AFC Divisional Game
NE 1998 9 7 0 .563 4th in AFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Jacksonville Jaguars in AFC Wild-Card Game
NE 1999 8 8 0 .500 5th in AFC East
NE total 27 21 0 .563 1 2 .333
SEA 2010 7 9 0 .438 1st in NFC West 1 1 .500 Lost to Chicago Bears in NFC Divisional Game
SEA 2011 7 9 0 .438 3rd in NFC West
SEA 2012 11 5 0 .688 2nd in NFC West 1 1 .500 Lost to Atlanta Falcons in NFC Divisional Game
SEA 2013 13 3 0 .813 1st in NFC West 3 0 1.000 Super Bowl XLVIII champions
SEA 2014 12 4 0 .750 1st in NFC West 2 1 .667 Lost to New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLIX
SEA 2015 10 6 0 .625 2nd in NFC West 1 1 .500 Lost to Carolina Panthers in NFC Divisional Game
SEA 2016 10 5 1 .656 1st in NFC West 1 1 .500 Lost to Atlanta Falcons in NFC Divisional Game
SEA 2017 9 7 0 .563 2nd in NFC West
SEA total 79 48 1 .621 9 5 .643
Total[7] 112 79 1 .586 10 7 .588

References[change | change source]

  1. Before sanctions, 97–19, as a result of 14 wins vacated by 2010 NCAA sanctions.
  2. Before sanctions 7–2, as a result of one bowl win vacated by 2010 NCAA sanctions.
  3. Chris Dufresne (June 11, 2010). "USC will keep 2004 AP championship". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 16, 2010. 
  4. Adam Rose (April 8, 2009). "Pete Carroll: The high school years". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 16, 2010. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 Jason Anderson (August 02, 2006). "Pete's party began at Pacific". Record.com. Retrieved October 16, 2010.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  6. Mike Sager (September 11, 2009). "Big Balls Pete Carroll". Esquire magazine. Retrieved October 16, 2010. 
  7. "Pete Carroll NFL Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved December 28, 2010. 

Other websites[change | change source]