Julian Bond

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Julian Bond
BondbyMontesbradley.jpg
Julian Bond
Member of the Georgia House of Representatives
from the 32nd district
In office
1967–1974
Succeeded byMildred Glover[1]
Member of the Georgia Senate
from the 39th district
In office
1975–1987
Preceded byHorace T. Ward[2]
Succeeded byHildred W. Shumake[3]
Chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
In office
1998–2010
Preceded byMyrlie Evers-Williams
Succeeded byRoslyn Brock
Personal details
Born
Horace Julian Bond

(1940-01-14)January 14, 1940
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
DiedAugust 15, 2015(2015-08-15) (aged 75)
Walton Beach, Florida, USA
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Alice Clopton (1961–1989, divorced)
Pamela S. Horowitz (1990–2015)
Alma materGeorge School
Morehouse College (BA, English, 1971)

Horace Julian Bond (January 14, 1940 - August 15, 2015), known as Julian Bond, was an American social activist, politician, professor, and writer. He was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Bond was elected to four terms in the Georgia House of Representatives and later to six terms in the Georgia Senate. From 1998 to 2010, he was chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the first president of the Southern Poverty Law Center.[4]

Bond died on August 15, 2015 from complications of vascular disease (blood vessel disease) in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, aged 75.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Members of Georgia House of Representatives alphabetically arranged according to names, with districts and post offices for the term 1974-1975", Acts and resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, Georgia Legislature, 1, p. 2019, 1974
  2. "Members of the Senate of Georgia by Districts in Numerical Order and Post Offices for the Term 1973-1974", Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, 1, p. 1671, 1973
  3. "Members of Georgia House of Representatives for the term 1987-1988 by districts and addresses", Acts and resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, Georgia Legislature, p. CLXXIV
  4. Montes-Bradley, Eduardo. "Julian Bond: Reflections from the Frontlines of the Civil Rights Movement". Alexander Street Press, 2013.
  5. "Julian Bond, civil rights leader and former NAACP chairman, dies at 75". CNN.com. Retrieved August 16, 2015.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Julian Bond at Wikimedia Commons