Titles of European royal heirs

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Ferdinando de' Medici, Grand Prince of Tuscany heir to the Tuscan throne all his life.
Charles Emmanuel IV of Sardinia while known as the Prince of Piedmont.
His Royal Highness The Hereditary Grand Duke of Luxembourg. Present day heir to the Luxembourgish grand ducal throne.

Many past and present European monarchies have reserved titles used just by the heir apparent to the throne. The famous example of this is Charles, Prince of Wales, heir to the British throne.[1]

Titles in present and former kingdoms[change | change source]

Other states[change | change source]

General[change | change source]

  • Hereditary Prince of Monaco. Used by the heir to the Principality of Monaco.
  • Hereditary Prince of Liechtenstein used by the heir to the Principality of Liechtenstein.
  • Hereditary Grand Duke of Luxembourg. Used by the heir to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

German states[change | change source]

Prior to the unification of Germany, the area was made up of dozens of small principalities such as Duchies and Grand Duchies[2] and most of them used the titles of Hereditary, Grand Duke or Hereditary Prince [followed by name of state] such as:

  • His Royal Highness The Hereditary Prince of Baden the heir to the Grand Duchy of Baden.[3]
  • His Royal Highness The Hereditary Grand Duke of Hesse heir to the Grand Duchy of Hesse.
  • His Royal Highness The Hereditary Grand Duke of Oldenburg heir to the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg.
  • His Serene Highness The Hereditary Prince of the Palatinate heir to the Electorate of the Palatinate.
  • His Highness The Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha heir to the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.
  • His Royal Highness The Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. heir to the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin.
  • His Serene Highness The Hereditary Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont heir to the Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont.

Italian states[change | change source]

Examples[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Plantagenet Somerset Fry, The Kings & Queens of England & Scotland (New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1990), p. 57
  2. Janet Robinson; Joe Robertson, Handbook of Imperial Germany (Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse, 2009), p. 68
  3. Jonathan Steinberg, Bismarck: A Life (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), p. 111