Brother Bear

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Brother Bear
Directed by Aaron Blaise
Robert Walker
Produced by Igor Khait
Chuck Williams
Written by Lorne Cameron
David Hoselton
Tab Murphy
Steve Bencich (screenplay)
Broose Johnson (story)
Jeffrey Stepakoff (additional writer, story)
Starring Joaquin Phoenix
Jeremy Suarez
Rick Moranis
Dave Thomas
Jason Raize
D.B. Sweeney
Joan Copeland
Michael Clarke Duncan
Music by Phil Collins
Mark Mancina
Studio Walt Disney Pictures
Walt Disey Feature Animation
Release date(s) November 1, 2003
Running time 85 minutes
Language English
Money made $250,397,277

Brother Bear is a 2003 Academy Award nominated traditionally-animated movie produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on November 1, 2003. It is about a human named Kenai who turns into a bear and discovers brotherhood. The 43rd animated feature in the Disney animated features canon, it was originally titled Bears, and was the third and final Disney animated movie produced mainly by the Feature Animation studio at Disney-MGM Studios in Orlando, Florida, that studio was shut down in March 2004, not long after the release of this movie in favor of computer animated features.[1] The movie received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Feature, but lost against Finding Nemo. A sequel, Brother Bear 2, was released on August 29, 2006.

The Story[change | change source]

Long ago, as the Earth was emerging from the Ice Age, there were three brothers. After a bear takes the life of Sitka, the oldest brother, the impulsive youngest brother Kenai kills the bear in revenge, only to be changed into a bear himself by the Great Spirits. Denahi, the middle brother, comes upon this bear and, thinking it killed Kenai, vows revenge. Now, with brother hunting brother, Kenai's only hope to change back is to find the place where the lights touch the Earth. Along the way he meets a grizzly cub named Koda, who is also going there. So the adventure ensues and in the end, Kenai (with the help of Koda) discovers the true meaning of brotherhood.

Reception[change | change source]

The reaction from movie reviewers was mixed to mainly negative with many panning the movie as coping older Disney movies like The Lion King and the 20th Century Fox movie Ice Age (although Brother Bear began production before Ice Age did), while others defended the movie as a different and resonable variation of the theme. The popular American movie critics Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper have given positive reviews of the movie. So far, Brother Bear holds a rating of 37% in Rotten Tomatoes, which says that "Brother Bear is gentle and pleasant if unremarkable Disney fare, with so-so animation and generic plotting".[2]

Voice cast[change | change source]

  • Joaquin Phoenix as Kenai, the youngest of three brothers who gets turned into a bear, to teach him to see through their eyes
  • Jeremy Suarez as Koda, a wisecracking grizzly bear cub, who helps Kenai on his journey to where the Lights Touch the Earth
  • Rick Moranis as Rutt, a comic Canadian moose
  • Dave Thomas as Tuke, another comic Canadian moose
  • Jason Raize as Denahi, the middle brother
  • D.B. Sweeney as Sitka, the oldest brother
  • Joan Copeland as Tanana, the shaman-woman of Kenai's tribe
  • Michael Clarke Duncan as Tug, a wise old cave bear
  • Frank Welker as Animals' vocal effects (uncredited)

Crew[change | change source]

Crew Position
Directed by Aaron Blaise
Robert Walker
Produced by Chuck Williams
Written by Tab Murphy
Lorne Cameron
David Hoselton
Steve Bencich
Ron J. Friedman
Songs by Phil Collins
Original Score by Mark Mancina
Phil Collins
Associate Producer Igor Khait
Art Director Robh Ruppel
Film Editor Tim Mertens
Artistic Supervisors Steve Anderson (Story supervisor)
Jeff Dickson (Layout supervisor)
Barry R. Kooser (Background supervisor)
Phillip S. Boyd & Chrisine Lawrence-Finney (Clean-up supervisor)
Garrett Wren (Effects supervisor)
Supervising Animators Byron Howard (Kenai-Bear)
Alex Kuperschmidt (Koda)
Ruben A. Aquino (Denahi)
James Young Jackson (Kenai-Human)
Tony Stanley (Rutt)
Broose Johnson (Tuke)
Anthony Wayne Michaels (Sitka)
Tom Gately (Tanana)
Rune Brandt Bennicke (Tug & Koda's Mom)
Background Stylist
Character Design
Artistic Coordinator
Production Manager
Xiangyuan Jie
Rune Brandt Bennicke
Kirk Bodyfelt
Bruce Anderson

Songs[change | change source]

Song Performed by Available on the soundtrack disc? Heard in the film?
Great Spirits Tina Turner Yes Yes
Transformation Phil Collins Yes No
Transformation Bulgarian Women's Choir Yes Yes
On My Way Phil Collins Yes Yes (except Koda sings the first few lyrics and the last lyric)
On My Way (this version contains Koda singing the first few lyrics and the last lyric) Jeremy Suarez
Phil Collins
No Yes
Welcome Phil Collins Yes No
Welcome Phil Collins
The Blind Boys of Alabama
Yes Yes
No Way Out (theme from Brother Bear) Phil Collins Yes Yes
Look Through My Eyes Phil Collins Yes Yes (also on bonus material)

Score by Mark Mancina/Phil Collins

Deleted songs[change | change source]

  • "The Fishing Song" - This was intended for the salmon run sequence, but was replaced by "Welcome".
  • "This Can't Be My Destiny" This was song by Phil Collins. But unfortunately it never made it to the movie. The song was however mention in the special feature by Phil Collins. This song was never released.

Sequel[change | change source]

Brother Bear 2 was released August 29, 2006.

Television series[change | change source]

It is unknown when there will be a television spin-off of Brother Bear.

References[change | change source]

  1. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0328880/news Brother Bear (2003) - News
  2. http://www.animated-news.com/2003/brother-bear-two-thumbs-up/ Animated News » Brother Bear Two Thumbs Up!

Other websites[change | change source]