British Rail Class 86

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British Rail Class 86
86613 and 86610 at Ipswich.JPG
Class 86/6, nos. 86613 and 86610, painted in the new Freightliner livery, at Ipswich on 14th February 2004. Freightliner are now the largest operator of Class 86 locomotives.
Type and origin
Power type Electric
Builder British Rail Doncaster Works (60);
English Electric at Vulcan Foundry (40)
Build date 1965–1966
Total produced 100
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte Bo-Bo
 • UIC Bo'Bo'
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Wheel diameter 3 ft 9 in (1.143 m)
Length 58 ft 6 in (17.83 m)
Loco weight 81 long tons (82 t)
Electric system/s 25 kV AC
Current pickup(s) Pantograph
Traction motors 900 hp (670 kW) AEI 282AZ, or
1,000 hp (750 kW) AEI 282BZ, or
1,250 hp (930 kW) GEC G412AZ, (all 4 off)
Train heating Electric Train Heating
Train brakes Dual vacuum & air
Performance figures
Top speed 100–110 mph (160–180 km/h)
Power output 3,600 hp (2,680 kW), 4,040 hp (3,010 kW), or 5,000 hp (3,700 kW)
Tractive effort 60,000 lbf (267 kN)
Brakeforce 66.5 long tons-force (663 kN)
Career
Railroad(s) British Rail,
Freightliner,
Network Rail,
GB Railfreight
Number E3101–E3200; later 86001–86048, 86201–86252
Axle load class Route availability 6
Class 86/2, no. 86 252 at Birmingham New Street during the BR blue era. This locomotive was originally E3101, the class pioneer.
Class 86/6, nos. 86613 and 86610, painted in the new Freightliner livery, at Ipswich on 14th February 2004. Freightliner are now the main operator of Class 86 locomotives.
Class 86/2, no. 86229 'Lions Club International', at Birmingham New Street on 5th June 2003, on a service to London Euston. This locomotive was one of the final three Class 86 locomotives operated by Virgin Trains, and was withdrawn from service in September 2003. It has since been bought for further use by Fragonset Railways.

The British Rail Class 86 was the standard electric locomotive built during the 1960s, developed as a result of testing with the earlier Classes 81, 82, 83, 84 and 85. One hundred of these locomotives were built from 1965-1966 by either English Electric at Vulcan Foundry, Newton-le-Willows, or British Rail (BR) at their Doncaster works. The class was built to haul trains on the then newly electrified West Coast Main Line, from London Euston, to Birmingham, Crewe, Manchester Piccadilly, Liverpool and later Preston and Glasgow. They helped to replace steam locomotives, which were finally withdrawn by BR in 1968.