John Thune

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John Thune
John Thune, official portrait, 111th Congress.jpg
Senate Majority Whip
Assumed office
January 3, 2019
LeaderMitch McConnell
Preceded byJohn Cornyn
Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee
In office
January 3, 2015 – January 3, 2019
Preceded byJay Rockefeller
Succeeded byRoger Wicker
Chairman of the Senate Republican Conference
In office
January 26, 2012 – January 3, 2019
LeaderMitch McConnell
Preceded byLamar Alexander
Succeeded byJohn Barrasso
United States Senator
from South Dakota
Assumed office
January 3, 2005
Serving with Mike Rounds
Preceded byTom Daschle
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Dakota's at-large district
In office
January 3, 1997 – January 3, 2003
Preceded byTim Johnson
Succeeded byBill Janklow
Personal details
Born
John Randolph Thune

(1961-01-07) January 7, 1961 (age 58)
Pierre, South Dakota, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)
Kimberley Weems (m. 1984)
Children2
EducationBiola University (BA)
University of South Dakota (MBA)
WebsiteSenate website

John Randolph Thune (born January 7, 1961)[1] is an American politician. Thune is the junior United States Senator from South Dakota and a member of the Republican Party. He used to be a United States Representative for South Dakota's at-large congressional district.

Thune was born on January 7, 1961 in Murdo, South Dakota. He is of Norwegian descent.[2] Thune studied at Biola University and at the University of South Dakota. He has been married to Kimberley Weems since 1984. They have two children.

Thune was selected by the Senate Republican Conference to become the Majority Whip for the 116th Congress, replacing Senator John Cornyn of Texas, who was term limited in the position.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. Brooks, David (2009-11-13). "Meet John Thune". The New York Times.
  2. "John Thune ancestry". Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved May 2, 2013.
  3. John Wagner; Mike DeBonis (November 14, 2018). "Congressional leadership elections: McConnell and Schumer keep the top spots; Pelosi seeks to shore up votes for speaker". The Washington Post.

Other websites[change | change source]