Mirandese language

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Mirandese
mirandés
Native toPortugal
RegionTerra de Miranda (Miranda do Douro, Vimioso and Mogadouro)
Native speakers
15,000 (2000)[1]
(10,000 use it regularly, 5,000 when they return to the area)[2]
Official status
Official language in
Co-official recognition. Special protection status in Miranda do Douro, Portugal. Statutory language of provincial identity in 4 municipalities, northeast Portugal (1999, Law No. 7-99 of 29 January).[2]
Regulated byAnstituto de la Lhéngua Mirandesa
Language codes
ISO 639-2mwl
ISO 639-3mwl
Glottologmira1251
ELPMiranda do Douro
Linguasphere51-AAA-cb
Locator map of Miranda do Douro.svg
Locator map of the Miranda do Douro municipality, which harbors the vast majority of Mirandese speakers.
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.
Street sign in Genísio, with the street name in Mirandese and in Portuguese

The Mirandese language or lhéngua mirandesa is an Astur-Leonese language or language variety[3] that is sparsely spoken in a small area of northeastern Portugal in Terra de Miranda (made up of the municipalities of Miranda do Douro, Mogadouro and Vimioso).

Recognition[change | change source]

The Assembly of the Republic granted it official recognition alongside Portuguese for local matters on 17 September 1998 with the law 7/99 of 29 January 1999.[4] In 2001, Mirandese was officially recognised by the European Bureau for Lesser-Used Languages, which aims to promote the survival of the least spoken European languages.[5]

Roots[change | change source]

Mirandese has a distinct phonology, morphology and syntax. It has its roots in the local Vulgar Latin spoken in the northern Iberian Peninsula.

Mirandese is a descendant of the Astur-Leonese variety spoken in the Kingdom of León and has both archaisms and innovations that differentiate it from the modern varieties of Astur-Leonese spoken in Spain. In recognition of these differences, and due to its political isolation from the rest of the Astur-Leonese speaking territory, Mirandese has adopted a different written norm to the one used in Spain for Astur-Leonese.

References[change | change source]

  1. Mirandese at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Mirandese language at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  3. "Discovering Mirandese". Terminology Coordination Unit. 2015-05-26. Retrieved 2020-01-24.
  4. "Lei 7/99, 1999-01-29". Diário da República Eletrónico (in Portuguese). Retrieved 2020-01-24.
  5. Svobodová, Petra. "Mirandese language and its influence on the culture of the municipality of Miranda do Douro". Universidade Palacký.