Results of the 2016 Republican Party presidential primaries

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Republican Party presidential primaries, 2016

← 2012 February 1 – June 7, 2016 2020 →

2,472 delegates to the Republican National Convention
1,237 delegates votes needed to win
  Donald Trump August 19, 2015 (cropped).jpg Ted Cruz by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg
Candidate Donald Trump Ted Cruz
Home state New York Texas
States carried 41 11
  Marco Rubio by Gage Skidmore2.jpg Governor John Kasich (cropped2).jpg
Candidate Marco Rubio John Kasich
Home state Florida Ohio
States carried 3 1

Republican Party presidential primaries results, 2016.svg
First place (popular vote or delegate count)
     Donald Trump       Ted Cruz       Marco Rubio       John Kasich


Nominee before election

Mitt Romney

Nominee

TBD


This article shows the results of the Republican Party presidential primaries, 2016. The Republican Party presidential primary is a process of choosing delegates, or people that represent someone, to go to the 2016 Republican National Convention. People in each state will vote on who they think will be good for the presidency, and each candidate gets a certain amount of delegates based on the number of votes they receive.

The primaries began on 1 February 2016 in Iowa.[1] On May 4, 2016, Donald Trump became the only candidate left in the race.[2][3] He became the official Republican nominee on July 19, 2016.[4] Trump would later win the presidency on November 8.[5]

Main candidates[change | change source]

The following table shows all the candidates who have/had a major campaign.[6]

Candidate Most recent position Announced Withdrew State
Jeb Bush Governor June 15, 2015 February 20, 2016[7] Florida
Ben Carson Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery May 4, 2015 March 4, 2016[8] Maryland
Chris Christie Governor June 30, 2015 February 10, 2016[9] New Jersey
Ted Cruz Senator March 23, 2015 May 3, 2016[10] Texas
Carly Fiorina Chief Executive Officer May 4, 2015 February 10, 2016[11] Virginia
Jim Gilmore Governor July 30, 2015 February 12, 2016[12] Virginia
Lindsey Graham Senator June 1, 2015 December 21, 2015[13] South Carolina
Mike Huckabee Governor May 5, 2015 February 1, 2016[14] Arkansas
Bobby Jindal Governor June 24, 2015 November 17, 2015[15] Louisiana
John Kasich Governor July 21, 2015 May 4, 2016[3] Ohio
George Pataki Governor May 28, 2015 December 29, 2015[16] New York
Rick Perry Governor June 4, 2015 September 11, 2015[17] Texas
Rand Paul Senator April 7, 2015 February 3, 2016[18] Kentucky
Marco Rubio Senator April 13, 2015 March 15, 2016[19] Florida
Rick Santorum Senator May 27, 2015 February 3, 2016[20] Pennsylvania
Donald Trump Chairman June 16, 2015 Won New York
Scott Walker Governor July 13, 2015 September 21, 2015[21] Wisconsin

Results[change | change source]

Top seven[change | change source]

Candidates Donald Trump August 19, 2015 (cropped).jpg
Donald Trump
Ted Cruz by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg
Ted Cruz
Marco Rubio by Gage Skidmore2.jpg
Marco Rubio
Governor John Kasich (cropped2).jpg
John Kasich
Ben Carson by Gage Skidmore 3.jpg
Ben Carson
Governor of Florida Jeb Bush at Conservative Political Action Committee CPAC 2015 in National Harbor, Maryland by Michael Vadon 08.jpg
Jeb Bush
Carly Fiorina (16991338093) (cropped).jpg
Carly Fiorina
Total delegates 1,441 551 173 161 7 4 1
Popular votes 14,015,993 7,822,100 3,515,576 4,290,448 857,039 286,694 40,666
Results
Feb 1 Iowa 24% 28% 23% 2% 9% 3% 2%
Feb 9 New Hampshire 35% 12% 11% 16% 2% 11% 4%
Feb 20 South Carolina 33% 22% 22% 8% 7% 8%
Feb 23 Nevada 46% 21% 24% 4% 5%
March 1 Alabama 43% 21% 19% 4% 10%
Alaska 34% 36% 15% 4% 11%
Arkansas 33% 31% 25% 4% 6%
Georgia 39% 24% 24% 6% 6%
Massachusetts 50% 10% 18% 18% 3%
Minnesota 21% 29% 37% 6% 7%
Oklahoma 28% 34% 26% 4% 6%
Tennessee 39% 25% 21% 5% 8%
Texas 27% 44% 18% 4% 4%
Vermont 33% 10% 19% 30% 4%
Virginia 35% 17% 32% 9% 6%
March 5 Kansas 23% 48% 17% 11%
Kentucky 36% 32% 16% 14%
Louisiana 41% 38% 11% 6%
Maine 33% 46% 8% 12%
March 6 Puerto Rico 13% 9% 71% 1%
March 8 Hawaii 42% 33% 13% 11%
Idaho 28% 45% 16% 7%
Michigan 37% 25% 9% 24%
Mississippi 47% 36% 5% 9%
March 12 District of Colombia 14% 12% 37% 36%
Wyoming 7% 66% 20% 0%
March 15 Florida 46% 17% 27% 7%
Illinois 39% 30% 9% 20%
Missouri 41% 41% 6% 10%
North Carolina 40% 37% 8% 13%
North Marianas 73% 24% 1% 2%
Ohio 36% 13% 3% 47%
March 22 Arizona 47% 25% 10%
Utah 14% 69% 17%
April 1-3 North Dakota ?% ?% ?
April 5 Wisconsin 35% 48% 14%
April 7-9 Colorado ? ?% ?
April 14-16 Wyoming ? ?% ?
April 19 New York 60% 15% 25%
April 26 Connecticut 58% 12% 29%
Delaware 61% 16% 20%
Maryland 54% 19% 23%
Pennsylvania 57% 22% 19%
Rhode Island 64% 10% 24%
May 3 Indiana 53% 37% 8%
May 10 Nebraska 61%
West Virginia 77%
May 17 Oregon 64%
May 24 Washington 75%
June 7 California 75%
Montana 74%
New Jersey 80%
New Mexico 71%
South Dakota 67%
% of popular vote 45.0% 25.1% 11.3% 13.8% 2.8% 0.9% 0.1%

Legend:      1st place

  • Only states that voted with pledged delegates are shown. The states/territories that voted for unpledged delegates are North Dakota, Colorado, Wyoming and Virgin Islands.

Statistics[change | change source]

Results by county:     Donald Trump     Ted Cruz     Marco Rubio     John Kasich     Ben Carson     Uncommitted

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Iowa caucuses: Ted Cruz wins; Clinton declares victory". CNN. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  2. "First on CNN: Kasich 'doing the right thing' by dropping out, Trump says". CNN. May 4, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "John Kasich exits the presidential race, leaving Trump as presumptive nominee". Washington Post. May 4, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  4. "Donald Trump Formally Nominated For President". Huffington Post. July 19, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  5. "Donald Trump Is Elected President in Stunning Repudiation of the Establishment". The New York Times. November 9, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  6. "Presidential candidates, 2016". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  7. "Jeb Bush drops out of 2016 presidential campaign". The Washington Post. February 20, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  8. "Ben Carson ends campaign, will lead Christian voter group". CNN. March 4, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  9. "Chris Christie suspends campaign". CNN. February 10, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  10. "Ted Cruz drops out of presidential race after Indiana loss". CBS News. May 3, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  11. "Carly Fiorina Drops Out of Republican Presidential Race". February 10, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  12. "Jim Gilmore drops out of GOP presidential race". February 12, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  13. "Lindsey Graham drops out of presidential race". December 21, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  14. "Mike Huckabee suspends his 2016 campaign". February 1, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  15. "Bobby Jindal drops out of White House race". Politico. November 17, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  16. "George Pataki drops presidential bid". CNN. December 30, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  17. "Rick Perry Ends His Run for President". The New York Times. September 11, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  18. "Rand Paul drops out of White House race". Politico. February 3, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  19. "A Distant Second at Home, Marco Rubio Ends a Disappointing Campaign". The New York Times. March 15, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  20. "Rick Santorum drops presidential bid, endorses Marco Rubio". CNN. February 3, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  21. "Scott Walker Ends His 2016 Presidential Run". The New York Times. September 21, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2017.