Republican Party presidential primaries, 2016

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2012 United States 2020
Republican Party presidential primaries, 2016
February 1 – June 7, 2016
Donald Trump August 19, 2015 (cropped).jpg Ted Cruz by Gage Skidmore 8.jpg
Candidate Donald Trump Ted Cruz
Home state New York Texas
Contests won 32 11
Marco Rubio by Gage Skidmore2.jpg Governor John Kasich (cropped2).jpg
Candidate Marco Rubio John Kasich
Home state Florida Ohio
States carried 3 1
Republican Party presidential primaries, 2016

First place (popular vote or delegate count)

     Donald Trump       Ted Cruz       Marco Rubio       John Kasich

The 2016 Republican Party presidential primaries and caucuses were held between February 1 and June 7, 2016. Sanctioned by the Republican Party, this series of elections selected the 2,472 delegates to the Republican National Convention, which selected the Republican Party's nominee for President of the United States.

On May 4, 2016, Donald Trump of New York became the presumptive nominee after his remaining challengers Ted Cruz of Texas and John Kasich of Ohio dropped out.[1][2]

Candidates[change | change source]

On March 23, 2015, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas formally announced his candidacy at Liberty University, and in the following months, sixteen more candidates (bringing the total to 17) entered the race: Former Governor Jeb Bush of Florida, neurosurgeon Ben Carson of Florida, Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, businesswoman Carly Fiorina of Virginia, Former Governor Jim Gilmore of Virginia, Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Former Governor Mike Huckabee of Arkansas, Governor Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, Governor John Kasich of Ohio, Former Governor George Pataki of New York, Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, Former Governor Rick Perry of Texas, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, Former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, businessman Donald Trump of New York, and Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin.

The total of 17 candidates makes it the largest presidential candidate field for any single political party in American history.[3]

Before the Iowa caucuses on February 1, candidates Perry, Walker, Jindal, Graham, and Pataki withdrew due to low polling numbers. While leading many polls entering the Iowa caucuses, Trump came in second behind Senator Cruz. Carson dropped out after Super Tuesday on March 4, 2016.

Money raised[change | change source]

This is an overview of the money used in the campaign as it is reported to Federal Election Committee and released on February 22, 2016. Outside groups are Independent expenditure only committees also called PACs and SuperPACs. Several such groups normally support each candidate but the numbers in the tablet are a total of all of them. This means that a group of committees can be shown as technical insolvent (shown in red) even though it is not the case of all of them.

The Campaign Committees debt are shown in red if the campaign is technical insolvent. The source of all the numbers is Center for Responsive Politics.[4] Jim Gilmore's information is not currently available.

Candidate Campaign committee (as of January 31) Outside groups (as of February 22) Total spent Suspended
campaign
Money Raised Money spent Cash on hand Debt Money Raised Money spent Cash on hand
Donald Trump $25,526,319 $23,941,598 $1,584,721 $17,534,058 $1,894,509 $1,798,720 $95,789 $25,740,318 Active
Ted Cruz $54,661,506 $41,016,086 $13,645,419 $0 $46,726,605 $21,280,797 $25,445,808 $62,296,883 May 3, 2016
John Kasich $8,648,890 $7,172,247 $1,476,642 $0 $6,729,311 $10,958,007 $-4,228,696 $18,130,254 May 4, 2016
Marco Rubio $34,652,654 $32,935,702 $5,055,407 $98,000 $34,313,903 $28,334,553 $5,979,350 $61,270,255 March 15, 2016
Ben Carson $57,860,505 $53,713,834 $4,146,671 $0 $13,807,549 $13,985,768 $-178,219 $67,699,602 March 4, 2016
Jeb Bush $33,512,524 $30,632,058 $2,880,466 $59,136 $118,740,817 $94,262,809 $24,478,008 $124,894,867 February 20, 2016
Chris Christie $7,995,895 $7,254,221 $741,674 $72,579 $23,156,157 $21,849,465 $1,306,692 $29,103,686 February 10, 2016
Carly Fiorina $11,848,450 $8,490,693 $3,357,756 $0 $14,184,857 $11,768,162 $2,416,695 $20,258,855 February 10, 2016
Rick Santorum $1,426,163 $1,403,380 $41,966 $899,356 $642,416 $1,032,603 $-390,187 $2,435,983 February 3, 2016
Rand Paul $12,158,052 $11,303,910 $854,142 $292,311 $10,591,125 $8,160,980 $2,430,145 $19,464,891 February 3, 2016
Mike Huckabee $4,114,116 $4,075,073 $39,044 $55,384 $5,862,475 $5,820,361 $42,115 $9,895,434 February 1, 2016
George Pataki $544,183 $524,850 $19,332 $20,000 $1,547,674 $1,510,759 $36,915 $2,035,609 December 29, 2015
Lindsey Graham $5,629,463 $5,329,046 $300,417 $57,041 $4,388,304 $4,279,062 $109,242 $9,608,108 December 21, 2015
Bobby Jindal $1,442,464 $1,442,464 $0 $0 $4,517,207 $4,517,874 $-666 $5,960,337 November 17, 2015
Scott Walker $8,076,155 $7,996,958 $79,197 $1,078,876 $24,436,318 $24,393,632 $42,686 $32,390,590 September 21, 2015
Rick Perry $1,427,133 $1,766,819 $2,403 $0 $15,231,068 $15,356,117 $-125,050 $17,122,936 September 11, 2015
Active campaigns highlighted in this color

Notes

This is mainly a personal loan from the candidate to the campaign as part of the candidate's self-financing.

Results[change | change source]

     Donald Trump      Ted Cruz      Marco Rubio      John Kasich      Ben Carson      Tie

After the Iowa primaries, candidates Huckabee, Paul and Santorum withdrew due to poor performance at the ballot box. Following the New Hampshire primary, which was a sizable victory for Trump, candidates Christie, Fiorina and Gilmore withdrew. After the conclusion of the South Carolina primary, Bush withdrew from the race following a second win for Trump. Ben Carson dropped out on March 4, 2016. Marco Rubio dropped out on March 15, 2016 after losing to Trump in his home state of Florida. Ted Cruz dropped out on May 3, 2016 after losing to Trump in Indiana.

References[change | change source]

  1. "First on CNN: Kasich 'doing the right thing' by dropping out, Trump says". CNN. May 4, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017. 
  2. "John Kasich exits the presidential race, leaving Trump as presumptive nominee". Washington Post. May 4, 2016. Retrieved September 4, 2017. 
  3. Linshi, Jack. "More People Are Running for Presidential Nomination Than Ever". TIME.com. Retrieved 2016-02-14. 
  4. "2016 Presidential Race". OpenSecrets.org - Center for Responsive Politics. Retrieved 26 February 2016. 

Other websites[change | change source]