Christopher Plummer

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Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer 2014.jpg
Plummer in 2014
Born
Arthur Christopher Orme Plummer

(1929-12-13)December 13, 1929
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
DiedFebruary 5, 2021(2021-02-05) (aged 91)
EducationHigh School of Montreal
OccupationActor
Years active1946–2021
Spouse(s)
ChildrenAmanda Plummer
Parent(s)Isabella Mary Abbott (mother)
RelativesJohn Bethune
(great-great-great grandfather)
John Bethune the Younger
(great-great-grandfather)
Joseph Abbott
(great-great-grandfather)
John Abbott
(great-grandfather)
F. B. Fetherstonhaugh
(great-uncle)
Janina Fialkowska
(cousin)
AwardsFull list

Arthur Christopher Orme Plummer CC (December 13, 1929 – February 5, 2021) was a Canadian stage, voice, television and movie actor.

His first role was in the 1958 movie Stage Struck. He is known for his roles in The Sound of Music, The Night of the Generals, The Return of the Pink Panther and The Man Who Would be King. Plummer won an Academy Award for his performance in Beginners.[1][2]

For his performance in All the Money in the World, Plummer was nominated for the award for Best Supporting Actor, becoming the oldest person to be nominated for the Academy Award.

Early life[change | change source]

Plummer in 1959

Plummer was born in Toronto. His parents were Isabella Mary (née Abbott) and John Orme Plummer.[3] Plummer's great grandfather is Canadian prime minister John Abbott.[4] He is the grandson of John Bethune. Plummer studied at the Canadian Repertory Theatre.

Career[change | change source]

Plummer started acting in 1953. He played Captain von Trapp in the 1965 movie The Sound of Music.

Plummer played Mike Wallace in the movie The Insider. He played Charles Muntz in Up. He played 1 in 9. He played Leo Tolstoy in The Last Station. He played Doctor Parnassus in The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus. He played Henrik Vanger in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. He played Hal in Beginners. His role as Hal led his to his Academy Award win.

In 2017, Plummer replaced Kevin Spacey and played J. Paul Getty in the movie All the Money in the World.

Awards[change | change source]

Plummer won many awards for his roles. They include an Academy Award, two Emmy Awards, two Tony Awards, a Golden Globe Award, a Drama Desk Award, a SAG Award, and a BAFTA Award. With his win of an Academy Award for his role as Hal in Beginners, Plummer was the oldest actor to win an Academy Award.[5]

Plummer was both the oldest actor to win an Oscar, aged 82, and to be nominated, aged 88.[6]

Personal life[change | change source]

Plummer married Tammy Grimes from 1956 to 1960. They had a daughter, Amanda. He married Patricia Lewis from 1962 to 1967. He married Elaine Taylor in 1970.

Plummer died after falling and hitting his head at his home in Weston, Connecticut on February 5, 2021.[7][8] He was 91 years old.[9]

References[change | change source]

  1. Christopher Plummer Best Supporting Actors Beginners winner award at Telegraph.co.uk
  2. Christopher Plummer becomes oldest acting Oscar winner at CBS News.com
  3. Witchel, Alex (19 November 2008). "Christopher Plummer's legendary life, wonderfully retold". The New York Times. NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2012-07-25.
  4. "Christopher Plummer overview". MSN.com. Retrieved October 5, 2014.
  5. "Awards for Christopher Plummer". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved July 25, 2012.
  6. "Christopher Plummer Becomes Oldest Actor to Be Nominated for an Oscar". Variety. January 23, 2018.
  7. Fleming, Mike Jr. (February 5, 2021). "Christopher Plummer Passes Away At 91; 'Sound Of Music,' 'All The Money In The World' Star A True Hollywood Legend". Deadline. Archived from the original on April 1, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  8. "Christopher Plummer, 'Sound of Music' star and oldest actor to win an Oscar, dead at 91". CBC News. Archived from the original on February 16, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2021.
  9. Weber, Bruce (February 5, 2021). "Christopher Plummer, Actor From Shakespeare to 'The Sound of Music,' Dies at 91". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 1, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2021.

Other websites[change | change source]