Hui people

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The Hui people (Chinese: 回族; pinyin: Huízú) are one of the 56 recognized ethnic groups in China. Even though they are ethnically related to the Han Chinese (being from the Central Plains) they are considered distinct from them because the majority practice Islam, unlike most of the Han Chinese. They are called the Hui (which translates into "return" in Chinese) because the Chinese recognize that one of the Five Pillars of Faith in Islam is the hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca. A traditional name for Islam in Chinese is Huíjiào (回教) for the same reason.

The Hui are the third largest ethnic group in and the largest Muslim-majority ethnic group in China with about 9.8 million people. The region with the largest number of Hui is Ningxia, China's Hui autonomous region. However, there are also many Hui living in Gansu, Xinjiang, Qinghai, Hebei, Henan, Yunnan, and Shandong.

Despite using some Arabic and Persian words in religious activities, Chinese is the first language of most Hui.[1] As a matter of fact, there are many Hui who know no Arabic other than words in everyday Islamic vocabulary.

Since the Hui follow the halal diet, the diet Muslims are commanded to eat, Hui food is made of largely of wheat, beef, and mutton, which is different from other kinds of Chinese food since they more often use rice and pork. A Hui dish famous throughout China is Lanzhou niurou lamian, or Lanzhou beef pulled noodles, which has around 100,000 restaurants in China.[2]

Hui who live in regions of the former Soviet Union and Xinjiang are called Dungan by Russians and Turkic-speaking people, but the Hui do not call themselves that name.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. "The Chinese Hui Ethnic Minority, Hui Ethnic Group in China". China Highlights. Retrieved 2019-03-04.
  2. "Fremont's Shinry Lamian serves Lanzhou noodles made by a master noodle-puller - SFChronicle.com". www.sfchronicle.com. 2018-08-10. Retrieved 2019-03-04.
  3. "Dungan people explained". everything.explained.today. Retrieved 2019-03-04.