Ulysses S. Grant

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Ulysses S. Grant
18th President of the United States
In office
March 4, 1869 – March 3, 1877
Vice President Schuyler Colfax (1869–1873); Henry Wilson (1873–1875)
Preceded by Andrew Johnson
Succeeded by Rutherford B. Hayes
Personal details
Born Hiram Ulysses Grant
April 27, 1822(1822-04-27)
Point Pleasant, Ohio
Died July 23, 1885(1885-07-23) (aged 63)
Mount McGregor, New York
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Julia Dent Grant

Ulysses S. Grant (April 27, 1822 - July 23, 1885[1]), born Hiram Ulysses Grant, was the general who helped the Union Army of the United States win the American Civil War and later became the 18th President of the United States (1869-1877).

Early Life[change | edit source]

Hiram Ulysses Grant was raised in Point Pleasant, Ohio. He lived up on a farm with his family, had three sisters and two brothers, and went to local schools before attending the Presbyterian Academy and then being appointed to West Point. He was not the best student though he was good at math. When he graduated, he was placed in the infantry.[2]

Name change[change | edit source]

Grant in 1869

When Grant arrived at West Point and discovered that the Academy had him registered under the wrong name as Ulysses S. Grant, he tried to get the error corrected. He was told that it didn't matter what he or his parents thought his name was, the official government application said his name was "Ulysses S." and that application could not be changed. If Hiram Ulysses Grant wanted to attend West Point, he would have to change his name.[3]

Pre-presidency & Presidency[change | edit source]

Before becoming the president, Grant was an officer in the Union Army (North). He fought in the Mexican War and became a general at the start of the American Civil War. He served as head of the Army of Tennessee and won victories at Shiloh, Vicksburg, and Chattanooga. He became the top general in the Union Army from 1864 to 1865, and fought several battles against Robert E. Lee.

Since he was able to do well fighting in the American Civil War, he gained popularity which helped him to become president. Even though he was a respected general and supported civil rights for African Americans, historians criticize his presidency because he appointed his friends into high political positions and tolerated their corruption (even though Grant himself was innocent). Grant was the first President of the United States to have both living parents attend his inauguration.[4]

Later life and death[change | edit source]

After his presidency, Grant was poor and was suffering from throat cancer. He wrote a book about his life that sold millions of copies. He died three days after he finished writing the book. He is buried with his wife Julia in Grant's Tomb, New York City, New York.

References[change | edit source]

Other websites[change | edit source]