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United States congressional delegations from Alabama

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Since Alabama became a U.S. state in 1819, it has sent congressional delegations to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. Each state votes for senators for 6 years. Each state also votes for a house representative for 2 years. Before become a state, the territory of Alabama elected a non-voting representative for Congress.

These are lists of the delegations from Alabama to the United States Congress.

Current delegation

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Current U.S. senators from Alabama
Alabama

CPVI (2022):[1]
R+16
Class II senator Class III senator

Tommy Tuberville
(Senior senator)

Katie Britt
(Junior senator)
Party Republican Republican
Incumbent since January 3, 2021 January 3, 2023

Alabama's current congressional delegation in the 118th Congress has two senators, who are both Republican. Alabama also has 7 representatives, 6 of them are Republican while the other one is a Democrat.

The current dean of the Alabama delegation is Representative Robert Aderholt. He has served in the U.S. Congress since 1997.

United States Senate

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Class II senator Congress Class III senator
William R. King (DR) 16th (1819–1821) John Williams Walker (DR)
17th (1821–1823)
William Kelly (DR)
18th (1823–1825)
William R. King (J) 19th (1825–1827) Henry H. Chambers (J)
Israel Pickens (J)
John McKinley (J)
20th (1827–1829)
21st (1829–1831)
22nd (1831–1833) Gabriel Moore (J)
23rd (1833–1835) Gabriel Moore (NR)
24th (1835–1837)
William R. King (D) 25th (1837–1839) John McKinley (D)
Clement Comer Clay (D)
26th (1839–1841)
27th (1841–1843)
Arthur P. Bagby (D)
28th (1843–1845)
Dixon Hall Lewis (D)
29th (1845–1847)
30th (1847–1849)
Benjamin Fitzpatrick (D) William R. King (D)
31st (1849–1851)
Jeremiah Clemens (D)
32nd (1851–1853)
Benjamin Fitzpatrick (D)
vacant[a] 33rd (1853–1855)
Clement Claiborne Clay (D)
34th (1855–1857) vacant[a]
Benjamin Fitzpatrick (D)
35th (1857–1859)
36th (1859–1861)
vacant[b] vacant
37th (1861–1863)
38th (1863–1865)
39th (1865–1867)
40th (1867–1869)
Willard Warner (R) George E. Spencer (R)
41st (1869–1871)
George Goldthwaite (D) 42nd (1871–1873)
43rd (1873–1875)
44th (1875–1877)
John T. Morgan (D) 45th (1877–1879)
46th (1879–1881) George S. Houston (D)
Luke Pryor (D)
James L. Pugh (D)
47th (1881–1883)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893)
53rd (1893–1895)
54th (1895–1897)
55th (1897–1899) Edmund Pettus (D)
56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903)
58th (1903–1905)
59th (1905–1907)
60th (1907–1909)
John H. Bankhead (D) Joseph F. Johnston (D)
61st (1909–1911)
62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915) vacant[c]
Francis S. White (D)
64th (1915–1917) Oscar Underwood (D)
65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
B. B. Comer (D)
J. Thomas Heflin (D)
67th (1921–1923)
68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929) Hugo Black (D)
71st (1929–1931)
John H. Bankhead II (D) 72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935)
74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
Dixie Bibb Graves (D)
J. Lister Hill (D)
76th (1939–1941)
77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947)
George R. Swift (D)
John Sparkman (D)
80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)
83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971) James Allen (D)
92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979)
Maryon Pittman Allen (D)
Donald Stewart (D)
Howell Heflin (D) 96th (1979–1981)
Jeremiah Denton (R)
97th (1981–1983)
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989) Richard Shelby (D)
101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
Richard Shelby (R)
104th (1995–1997)
Jeff Sessions (R) 105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013)
113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019)
Luther Strange (R)
Doug Jones (D)
116th (2019–2021)
Tommy Tuberville (R) 117th (2021-2023)
118th (2023–2025) Katie Britt (R)

United States House of Representatives

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1818–1819: 1 non-voting delegate

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Starting on January 29, 1818, Alabama Territory sent a non-voting delegate to the House.

Congress Delegate from
Territory's at-large district
15th (1817–1819) John Crowell (DR)
16th (March 4, 1819–
December 14, 1819)
vacant

1819–1823: 1 seat

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After being allowed into the Union on December 14, 1819, Alabama had one seat in the House.

Congress At-large district
16th (1819–1821) John Crowell (DR)
17th (1821–1823) Gabriel Moore (DR)

1823–1833: 3 seats

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After the 1820 census, Alabama had three seats.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd
18th (1823–1825) Gabriel Moore (DR)[d] John McKee (DR)[d] George W. Owen (DR)[d]
19th (1825–1827) Gabriel Moore (J) John McKee (J) George W. Owen (J)
20th (1827–1829)
21st (1829–1831) Clement Comer Clay (J) Robert E. B. Baylor (J) Dixon H. Lewis (J)
22nd (1831–1833) Samuel W. Mardis (J)

1833–1843: 5 seats

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After the 1830 census, Alabama had five seats. During the 27th Congress, those seats were voted on across the state at-large on a general ticket.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
23rd (1833–1835) Clement Comer Clay (J) John McKinley (J) Samuel W. Mardis (J) Dixon H. Lewis (N) John Murphy (J)
24th (1835–1837) Reuben Chapman (J) Joshua L. Martin (J) Joab Lawler (J) Francis S. Lyon (NR)
25th (1837–1839) Reuben Chapman (D) Joshua L. Martin (D) Joab Lawler (W) Dixon H. Lewis (D) Francis S. Lyon (W)
George W.
Crabb
(W)
26th (1839–1841) David Hubbard (D) James Dellet (W)
27th (1841–1843) 5 seats elected on a general ticket from Alabama's at-large district
1st seat 2nd seat 3rd seat 4th seat 5th seat
Reuben Chapman (D) George S. Houston (D) William Winter
Payne
(D)
Dixon H. Lewis (D) Benjamin G.
Shields
(D)

1843–1863: 7 seats

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After the 1840 census, Alabama re-continued using districts. They now had 7 districts.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th
28th
(1843–1845)
James Dellet (W) James E. Belser (D) Dixon H. Lewis (D) William Winter Payne (D) George S. Houston (D) Reuben Chapman (D) Felix G. McConnell (D)
William Lowndes
Yancey
(D)
29th
(1845–1847)
Edmund S. Dargan (D) Henry W.
Hilliard
(W)
James L. F. Cottrell (D) Franklin W. Bowdon (D)
30th
(1847–1849)
John Gayle (W) Sampson Willis
Harris
(D)
Samuel Williams Inge (D) Williamson
R. W. Cobb
(D)
31st
(1849–1851)
William J. Alston (W) David Hubbard (D)
32nd
(1851–1853)
John Bragg (D) James Abercrombie (W) William Russell Smith (U) George S. Houston (D) Alexander White (W)
33rd
(1853–1855)
Philip Phillips (D) William Russell Smith (D) James F. Dowdell (D)
34th
(1855–1857)
Percy Walker (KN) Eli S. Shorter (D) James F. Dowdell (D) William Russell Smith (KN) Sampson Willis
Harris
(D)
35th
(1857–1859)
James A.
Stallworth
(D)
Sydenham Moore (D) Jabez L. M.
Curry
(D)
36th
(1859–1861)
James L. Pugh (D) David Clopton (D)
Open seat during the American Civil War
37th
(1861–1863)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th
District

1863–1873: 6 seats

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After the 1860 census, Alabama was given six seats.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
Template:USCongressOrd39th (1863–1867) Open during the American Civil War
40th (1867–1869)
Francis W. Kellogg (R) C. W. Buckley (R) Benjamin W. Norris (R) Charles W. Pierce (R) John B. Callis (R) Thomas Haughey (R)
41st (1869–1871) Alfred Eliab Buck (R) Robert Stell Heflin (R) Charles Hays (R) Peter M. Dox (D) William C. Sherrod (D)
42nd (1871–1873) Benjamin S. Turner (R) William A. Handley (D) Joseph H. Sloss (D)

1873–1893: 8 seats

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After the 1870 census, Alabama was allowed eight seats. From 1873 to 1877, the two new seats were elected at large, statewide. However after 1877, the delegation was redistricted.

Congress District At-large seats
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 1st seat 2nd seat
43rd
(1873–1875)
Frederick G.
Bromberg
(LR)
James T. Rapier (R) Charles Pelham (R) Charles Hays (R) John Henry
Caldwell
(D)
Joseph Humphrey
Sloss
(D)
Charles Christopher
Sheats
(R)
Alexander White (R)
44th
(1875–1877)
Jeremiah Haralson (R) Jeremiah Norman
Williams
(D)
Taul Bradford (D) Goldsmith W. Hewitt (D) William H. Forney (D) Burwell B.
Lewis
(D)
45th
(1877–1879)
James T. Jones (D) Hilary A. Herbert (D) Jeremiah Norman
Williams
(D)
Charles M. Shelley (D) Robert F. Ligon (D) 7th district 8th district
William H. Forney (D) William W. Garth (D)
46th
(1879–1881)
Thomas H.
Herndon
(D)
William J. Samford (D) Thomas Williams (D) Burwell B. Lewis (D) William M. Lowe (GB)
Newton N. Clements (D)
47th
(1881–1883)
William C. Oates (D) Goldsmith W. Hewitt (D) Joseph Wheeler (D)
vacant[e] William M. Lowe (GB)[f]
Charles M. Shelley (D) Joseph Wheeler (D)
48th
(1883–1885)
Luke Pryor (D)
James T. Jones (D) George H. Craig (R)
49th
(1885–1887)
Alexander C.
Davidson
(D)
Thomas William
Sadler
(D)
John Mason Martin (D) Joseph Wheeler (D)
50th
(1887–1889)
James E. Cobb (D) John H. Bankhead (D)
51st
(1889–1891)
Richard H. Clarke (D) Louis W. Turpin (D)
J. V. McDuffie (R)
52nd
(1891–1893)
Louis W. Turpin (D)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
District

1893–1913: 9 seats

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After the 1890 census, Alabama was allowed nine seats.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
53rd
(1893–1895)
Richard H.
Clarke
(D)
Jesse F.
Stallings
(D)
William C. Oates (D) Gaston A. Robbins (D) James E. Cobb (D) John H.
Bankhead
(D)
William H.
Denson
(D)
Joseph
Wheeler
(D)
Louis W. Turpin (D)
George P.
Harrison Jr.
(D)
54th
(1895–1897)
Milford W.
Howard
(Pop)
Oscar Underwood (D)
William F. Aldrich (R) Albert T. Goodwyn (Pop) Truman H. Aldrich (R)
55th
(1897–1899)
George W.
Taylor
(D)
Henry D.
Clayton Jr.
(D)
Thomas S. Plowman (D) Willis Brewer (D) Oscar Underwood (D)
William F. Aldrich (R)
56th
(1899–1901)
Gaston A. Robbins (D) John L.
Burnett
(D)
William F. Aldrich (R) William
Richardson
(D)
57th
(1901–1903)
Ariosto A. Wiley (D) Sydney J. Bowie (D) C. W. Thompson (D)
58th
(1903–1905)
J. Thomas
Heflin
(D)
59th
(1905–1907)
60th
(1907–1909)
William Benjamin
Craig
(D)
Richmond P.
Hobson
(D)
Oliver C. Wiley (D)
61st
(1909–1911)
S. Hubert
Dent Jr.
(D)
62nd
(1911–1913)
Fred L. Blackmon (D)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
District

1913–1933: 10 seats

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After the 1910 census, Alabama was allowed ten seats. At first, the extra seat was elected at-large. Starting with the 1916 elections, the seats were redistricted and a tenth district was added.

Congress District At-large
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
63rd (1913–1915) George W.
Taylor
(D)
S. Hubert
Dent Jr.
(D)
Henry D.
Clayton Jr.
(D)
Fred L.
Blackmon
(D)
J. Thomas
Heflin
(D)
Richmond P.
Hobson
(D)
John L.
Burnett
(D)
William Richardson (D) Oscar
Underwood
(D)
John
Abercrombie
(D)
William O. Mulkey (D) C. C. Harris (D)
64th (1915–1917) Oscar Lee
Gray
(D)
Henry B.
Steagall
(D)
William B.
Oliver
(D)
Edward B. Almon (D) George
Huddleston
(D)
65th (1917–1919) 10th district
William B.
Bankhead
(D)
66th (1919–1921) John
McDuffie
(D)
William B.
Bowling
(D)
Lilius B.
Rainey
(D)
67th (1921–1923) John R.
Tyson
(D)
Lamar
Jeffers
(D)
68th (1923–1925) Miles C.
Allgood
(D)
J. Lister Hill (D)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
LaFayette L.
Patterson
(D)
71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
District

1933–1963: 9 seats

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After the 1930 census, Alabama was allowed nine seats.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
73rd (1933–1935) John McDuffie (D) J. Lister Hill (D) Henry B.
Steagall
(D)
Lamar Jeffers (D) Miles C. Allgood (D) William Bacon
Oliver
(D)
William B. Bankhead (D) Archibald H.
Carmichael
(D)
George
Huddleston
(D)
74th (1935–1937) Frank W.
Boykin
(D)
Sam Hobbs (D) Joe Starnes (D)
75th (1937–1939) Pete Jarman (D) John
Sparkman
(D)
Luther Patrick (D)
George M.
Grant
(D)
76th (1939–1941)
Zadoc Weatherford (D)
77th (1941–1943) Walter W. Bankhead (D)
Carter Manasco (D)
78th (1943–1945) George W.
Andrews
(D)
John P. Newsome (D)
79th (1945–1947) Albert Rains (D) Luther Patrick (D)
80th (1947–1949) Bob
Jones
(D)
Laurie C. Battle (D)
81st (1949–1951) Edward
deGraffenried
(D)
Carl Elliott (D)
82nd (1951–1953) Kenneth A.
Roberts
(D)
83rd (1953–1955) Armistead I.
Selden Jr.
(D)
84th (1955–1957) George
Huddleston Jr.
(D)
85th (1957–1959)
86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
District

1963–1973: 8 seats

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After the 1960 census, Alabama was allowed eight seats. During the 88th Congress, those seats were all voted on statewide at-large on a general ticket.

Congress 8 seats elected on a general ticket from Alabama's at-large district
1st seat 2nd seat 3rd seat 4th seat 5th seat 6th seat 7th seat 8th seat
88th (1963–1965) George
Huddleston Jr.
(D)
George M.
Grant
(D)
George Andrews (D) Kenneth A.
Roberts
(D)
Armistead I.
Selden Jr.
(D)
Albert Rains (D) Carl Elliott (D) Bob
Jones
(D)
Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
89th (1965–1967) Jack Edwards (R) Bill
Dickinson
(R)
George Andrews (D) Glenn Andrews (R) Armistead I.
Selden Jr.
(D)
John H.
Buchanan
Jr.
(R)
James D. Martin (R) Bob
Jones
(D)
90th (1967–1969) Bill Nichols (D) Tom Bevill (D)
91st (1969–1971) Walter Flowers (D)
92nd (1971–1973)
Elizabeth Andrews (D)

1973–present: 7 seats

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Since the 1970 census, Alabama has been allowed seven seats.

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th
93rd (1973–1975) Jack Edwards (R) Bill
Dickinson
(R)
Bill Nichols (D) Tom Bevill (D) Bob
Jones
(D)
John H.
Buchanan Jr.
(R)
Walter
Flowers
(D)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979) Ronnie Flippo (D)
96th (1979–1981) Richard
Shelby
(D)
97th (1981–1983) Albert Smith Jr. (R)
98th (1983–1985) Ben Erdreich
(D)
99th (1985–1987) Sonny
Callahan
(R)
100th (1987–1989) Claude
Harris Jr.
(D)
101st (1989–1991) Glen Browder (D)
102nd (1991–1993) Bud
Cramer
(D)
103rd (1993–1995) Terry Everett (R) Spencer Bachus (R) Earl
Hillard Sr.
(D)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999) Bob Riley (R) Robert
Aderholt
(R)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005) Jo Bonner (R) Mike Rogers (R) Artur Davis (D)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011) Bobby Bright (D) Parker Griffith (D)
Parker Griffith (R)
112th (2011–2013) Martha Roby (R) Mo Brooks (R) Terri Sewell (D)
113th (2013–2015)
Bradley Byrne (R)
114th (2015–2017) Gary Palmer (R)
115th (2017–2019)
116th (2019–2021)
117th (2021–2023) Jerry Carl (R) Barry Moore (R)
118th (2023–2025) Dale Strong (R)
Congress 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th
District
Democratic (D)
Democratic-Republican (DR)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Know Nothing (KN)
National Republican (NR)
Nullifier (N)
Populist (Pop)
Republican (R)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
[change | change source]
  1. 1.0 1.1 Seat was open due to the failure of the legislature to elect a senator by the beginning of the congress.
  2. George S. Houston showed his ability as a senator-elect on February 9, 1866, but was not allowed to take his seat. The reason was that Alabama did not rejoin the Union.
  3. The seat was open from August 8, 1913, to May 11, 1914. Henry D. Clayton was made a senator to fill the open seat caused by the death of Joseph F. Johnston in 1913, but his position was debated and taken away. Franklin Potts Glass Sr. was also made a senator, but the U.S. Senate voted not to give him it.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Supported the Jackson faction in the 1824 United States presidential election
  5. Seat was contested by James Q. Smith and declared vacant; the original representative won back his own seat.
  6. Successfully debated the election of the representative that was replaced.

References

[change | change source]
  1. "2022 Cook PVI: State Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved 2023-01-05.