Stephen Colbert

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Stephen Colbert

Colbert in November 2014
Birth name Stephen Tyrone Colbert[1]
Born May 13, 1964 (1964-05-13) (age 51)[2]
Washington, D.C., US
Medium Theatre, television, film, books
Nationality American
Years active 1984–present
Genres Sketch comedy, news satire, improvisational comedy, character comedy, political satire, observational comedy, blue comedy
Subject(s) American culture, American politics, American conservatism, The Christian Right, political punditry, popular culture, current events, mass media/news media, egomania, xenophobia, anti-intellectualism, sexuality
Influences Don Novello, Maurice Sendak, Bill Cosby,[3] George Carlin,[4] Dean Martin,[5] Jon Stewart,[6] Steve Martin[7] Bill O'Reilly[8]
Influenced Rob Corddry,[9] Ed Helms,[9] Aasif Mandvi[10]
Spouse Evelyn McGee-Colbert (3 children)
Notable works and roles Chuck Noblet in
Strangers with Candy
Stephen Colbert in
The Daily Show and
The Colbert Report
I Am America (And So Can You!)
America (The Book)
Phil Ken Sebben and Myron Reducto in Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law
Professor Richard Impossible in The Venture Bros.
Signature Stephen Colbert Signature.svg
Emmy Awards

Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program
2004, 2005, 2006 The Daily Show
2008 The Colbert Report
2010 The Colbert Report
2013 "The Colbert Report"

Outstanding Variety Series
2013 "The Colbert Report"
Grammy Awards
Best Comedy Album
2010 A Colbert Christmas: The Greatest Gift of All!

Stephen Tyrone Colbert (pronounced COL-bear) (born May 13, 1964) is an American actor, comedian, and writer. He was the host of The Colbert Report on Comedy Central from 2005 through 2014.[11] Colbert uses a special form of comedy called satire to make fun of politicians and the news media. Colbert is currently the host of The Late Show as of September 2015.

On The Colbert Report (which he pronounces IPA:[ˌkɔl'beɹ ɹəpɹ] to make the words sound the same), he pretends to be a right-wing talk show host. He likes to ask his guests very embarrassing questions that make it seem that he is a serious far right-wing conservative who is also not very smart. His TV personality centers on the idea that if enough people believe something, it will be true. This is largely based on conservative host Bill O'Reilly. He was granted a Super PAC for the South Carolina Republican Party primaries in the 2012 U.S. presidential election.[12]

Many famous American politicians and people in the news media agree to appear on his show because it is very popular. Colbert started as a comedy writer and performer for many other programs, such as The Daily Show and the Strangers with Candy movie, both also on Comedy Central.

He has also voiced Phil Ken Sebben and Reducto in Harvey Birdman, Attorney at Law. Colbert has written three books. I Am America (And So Can You!) was No. 1 on The New York Times Best Seller list. He grew up in South Carolina, the youngest of eleven children in a Catholic family,[13] and went to Northwestern University. He lives in Montclair with his wife and three children.[14] He has made a word, 'truthiness'.[15]

References[change | change source]

  1. Daly, Steven (May 18, 2008). Stephen Colbert: the second most powerful idiot in America. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved January 7, 2014
  2. "Monitor". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.) (1207): p. 29. May 18, 2012.
  3. Sternbergh, Adam (October 16, 2006). "Stephen Colbert Has America by the Ballots". New York. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  4. Rabin, Nathan (2006-01-25). "Stephen Colbert". The A.V. Club. The Onion. Retrieved 2014-01-07.
  5. Rabin, Nathan (January 25, 2006). "Stephen Colbert interview". The A.V. Club (The Onion).,13970/. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  6. Dowd, Maureen (November 16, 2006). "America's Anchors". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on December 9, 2006. Retrieved December 9, 2006.
  7. King, Larry. "Interview with Stephen Colbert". Larry King Live. October 11, 2007.
  8. Steinberg, Jacques (October 12, 2005). The News Is Funny, as a Correspondent Gets His Own Show. The New York Times. Retrieved on July 13, 2006.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Corddry, Rob. Interview with Terry Gross (March 8, 2007). Rob and Nate Corddry Find Their Place on TV. Fresh Air. WHYY. Retrieved on October 28, 2007.
  10. Deggans, Eric (June 1, 2008). "For Aasif Mandvi, cultural irreverence on 'The Daily Show'". St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved January 7, 2014.
  11. "Colbert's mock anti-Canada feud spirals on the Web".;_ylt=AnMEEUl3fc_1mMIFbkNktHwEtbAF;_ylu=X3oDMTJ0cWQ5OXBhBGFzc2V0A2FwLzIwMDkxMjA0L3VzX3R2X2NhbmFkaWFuX2NvbGJlcnQEcG9zAzEyBHNlYwN5bl9wYWdpbmF0ZV9zdW1tYXJ5X2xpc3QEc2xrA2NvbGJlcnRzbW9jaw--. Retrieved 2009-12-04.
  12. Shear, Michael (June 30, 2011). "Colbert Gets Permission to Form Super-PAC". The New York Times.

Other websites[change | change source]

Preceded by
David Letterman
Host of The Late Show
Succeeded by