Template:Infobox element/symbol-to-oxidation-state

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Usage[change source]

Automated used in {{Infobox element}} (talk):

  • Hg: {{Infobox element/symbol-to-oxidation-state|symbol=Hg}} → −2 , +1, +2 (a mildly basic oxide)
  • Hs: {{Infobox element/symbol-to-oxidation-state|symbol=Hs}} → (+2), (+3), (+4), (+6), +8[1][2][3] (parenthesized: prediction)

Comment options[change source]

|comment= options (as of November 2018):
comment=acidic (an acidic oxide)
comment=mildly acidic (a mildly acidic oxide)
comment=strongly acidic (a strongly acidic oxide)
comment=amphoteric (an amphoteric oxide)
comment=basic (a basic oxide)
comment=weakly basic (a weakly basic oxide)
comment=mildly basic (a mildly basic oxide)
comment=strongly basic (a strongly basic oxide)
comment=strongly basic expected (expected to have a strongly basic oxide) -- Ra
comment=oxidizes oxygen (oxidizes oxygen) -- F
comment=depending (depending on the oxidation state, an acidic, basic, or amphoteric oxide) -- Cr, Mn
comment=rarely non-0, weakly acidic (rarely more than 0; a weakly acidic oxide) -- Xe
comment=rarely non-0, unk oxide (rarely more than 0; oxide is unknown) -- Kr
 
comment=parenthesized (parenthesized: prediction)
comment=predicted (predicted)
comment=<any text> <any text>, including blank
 
WP:ENGVAR (set |engvar= in article page)
By default, element articles (and so infoboxes) are in en-US.
In article space, one can call an infobox with |engvar=en-GB, en-OED, which changes these spellings
comment=parenthesized
|engvar= (parenthesized: prediction)
|engvar=en-US (default) (parenthesized: prediction)
|engvar=en-GB (brackets: prediction)
|engvar=en-OED (brackets: prediction)
|engvar=en-FOO (parenthesized: prediction)


Data[change source]

Z Name Symbol complete main group val note
 
1 hydrogen H −1, +1 (an amphoteric oxide) −1, +1 1 I
2 helium He 0 0 18 0
3 lithium Li +1 (a strongly basic oxide) +1 1 I
4 beryllium Be 0,[4] +1,[5] +2 (an amphoteric oxide) +2 2 II
5 boron B −5, −1, 0,[6] +1, +2, +3[7][8] (a mildly acidic oxide) +3 13 III
6 carbon C −4, −3, −2, −1, 0, +1,[9] +2, +3,[10] +4[11] (a mildly acidic oxide) −4, −3, −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4 14 IV
7 nitrogen N −3, −2, −1, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5 (a strongly acidic oxide) −3, +3, +5 15 V
8 oxygen O −2, −1, 0, +1, +2 −2 16 VI
9 fluorine F −1, 0[12] (oxidizes oxygen) −1 17 VII
10 neon Ne 0 0 18 0
11 sodium Na −1, +1 (a strongly basic oxide) +1 1 I
12 magnesium Mg +1,[13] +2 (a strongly basic oxide) +2 2 II
13 aluminium Al −2, −1, +1,[14] +2,[15] +3 (an amphoteric oxide) +3 13 III
14 silicon Si −4, −3, −2, −1, 0,[16] +1,[17] +2, +3, +4 (an amphoteric oxide) −4, +4 14 IV
15 phosphorus P −3, −2, −1, 0,[18] +1,[19] +2, +3, +4, +5 (a mildly acidic oxide) −3, +3, +5 15 V
16 sulfur S −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (a strongly acidic oxide) −2, +2, +4, +6 16 VI
17 chlorine Cl −1, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7 (a strongly acidic oxide) −1, +1, +3, +5, +7 17 VII
18 argon Ar 0 0 18 0
19 potassium K −1, +1 (a strongly basic oxide) +1 1 I
20 calcium Ca +1,[20] +2 (a strongly basic oxide) +2 2 II
21 scandium Sc 0,[21] +1,[22] +2,[23] +3 (an amphoteric oxide) +3 3 III
22 titanium Ti −2, −1, 0,[24] +1, +2, +3, +4[25] (an amphoteric oxide) +2, +3, +4 4 IV
23 vanadium V −3, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5 (an amphoteric oxide) +2, +3, +4, +5 5 V
24 chromium Cr −4, −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (depending on the oxidation state, an acidic, basic, or amphoteric oxide) +2, +3, +6 6 VI
25 manganese Mn −3, −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7 (depending on the oxidation state, an acidic, basic, or amphoteric oxide) +2, +4, +7 7 VII
26 iron Fe −4, −2, −1, 0, +1,[26] +2, +3, +4, +5,[27] +6, +7[28] (an amphoteric oxide) +2, +3, +6 8 VIII
27 cobalt Co −3, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5[29] (an amphoteric oxide) +2, +3 9 VIII
28 nickel Ni −2, −1, 0, +1,[30] +2, +3, +4[31] (a mildly basic oxide) +2 10 VIII
29 copper Cu −2, 0,[32] +1, +2, +3, +4 (a mildly basic oxide) +1, +2 11 I
30 zinc Zn −2, 0, +1, +2 (an amphoteric oxide) +2 12 II
31 gallium Ga −5, −4, −3,[33] −2, −1, +1, +2, +3[34] (an amphoteric oxide) +3 13 III
32 germanium Ge −4 −3, −2, −1, 0,[35] +1, +2, +3, +4 (an amphoteric oxide) −4, +2, +4 14 IV
33 arsenic As −3, −2, −1, 0,[36] +1,[37] +2, +3, +4, +5 (a mildly acidic oxide) −3, +3, +5 15 V
34 selenium Se −2, −1, +1,[38] +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (a strongly acidic oxide) −2, +2, +4, +6 16 VI
35 bromine Br −1, +1, +3, +4, +5, +7 (a strongly acidic oxide) −1, +1, +3, +5 17 VII
36 krypton Kr 0, +1, +2 (rarely more than 0; oxide is unknown) 0 18 0
37 rubidium Rb −1, +1 (a strongly basic oxide) +1 1 I
38 strontium Sr +1,[39] +2 (a strongly basic oxide) +2 2 II
39 yttrium Y 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a weakly basic oxide) +3 3 III
40 zirconium Zr −2, 0, +1,[41] +2, +3, +4 (an amphoteric oxide) +4 4 IV
41 niobium Nb −3, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5 (a mildly acidic oxide) +5 5 V
42 molybdenum Mo −4, −2, −1, 0, +1,[42] +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (a strongly acidic oxide) +4, +6 6 VI
43 technetium Tc −3, −1, 0, +1,[43] +2, +3,[43] +4, +5, +6, +7 (a strongly acidic oxide) +4, +7 7 VII
44 ruthenium Ru −4, −2, 0, +1,[44] +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7, +8 (a mildly acidic oxide) +3, +4 8 VIII
45 rhodium Rh −3[45], −1, 0, +1,[46] +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (an amphoteric oxide) +3 9 VIII
46 palladium Pd 0, +1, +2, +3, +4 (a mildly basic oxide) 0, +2, +4 10 VIII
47 silver Ag −2, −1, +1, +2, +3 (an amphoteric oxide) +1 11 I
48 cadmium Cd −2, +1, +2 (a mildly basic oxide) +2 12 II
49 indium In −5, −2, −1, +1, +2, +3[47] (an amphoteric oxide) +3 13 III
50 tin Sn −4, −3, −2, −1, 0,[48] +1,[49] +2, +3,[50] +4 (an amphoteric oxide) −4, +2, +4 14 IV
51 antimony Sb −3, −2, −1, 0,[51] +1, +2, +3, +4, +5 (an amphoteric oxide) −3, +3, +5 15 V
52 tellurium Te −2, −1, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (a mildly acidic oxide) −2, +2, +4, +6 16 VI
53 iodine I −1, +1, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7 (a strongly acidic oxide) −1, +1, +3, +5, +7 17 VII
54 xenon Xe 0, +1, +2, +4, +6, +8 (rarely more than 0; a weakly acidic oxide) 0 18 0
55 caesium Cs −1, +1[52] (a strongly basic oxide) +1 1 I
56 barium Ba +1, +2 (a strongly basic oxide) +2 2 II
57 lanthanum La 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a strongly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
58 cerium Ce +1, +2, +3, +4 (a mildly basic oxide) +3, +4 n/a -
59 praseodymium Pr 0,[40] +1,[53] +2, +3, +4, +5 (a mildly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
60 neodymium Nd 0,[40] +2, +3, +4 (a mildly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
61 promethium Pm +2, +3 (a mildly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
62 samarium Sm 0,[40] +2, +3 (a mildly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
63 europium Eu 0,[40] +2, +3 (a mildly basic oxide) +2, +3 n/a -
64 gadolinium Gd 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a mildly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
65 terbium Tb 0,[40] +1, +2, +3, +4 (a weakly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
66 dysprosium Dy 0,[40] +1, +2, +3, +4 (a weakly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
67 holmium Ho 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a basic oxide) +3 n/a -
68 erbium Er 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a basic oxide) +3 n/a -
69 thulium Tm 0,[40] +2, +3 (a basic oxide) +3 n/a -
70 ytterbium Yb 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a basic oxide) +3 n/a -
71 lutetium Lu 0,[40] +1, +2, +3 (a weakly basic oxide) +3 3 III
72 hafnium Hf −2, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4 (an amphoteric oxide) +4 4 IV
73 tantalum Ta −3, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5 (a mildly acidic oxide) +5 5 V
74 tungsten W −4, −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (a mildly acidic oxide) +4, +6 6 VI
75 rhenium Re −3, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7 (a mildly acidic oxide) +4 7 VII
76 osmium Os −4, −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7, +8 (a mildly acidic oxide) +4 8 VIII
77 iridium Ir −3, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7, +8, +9[54] +3, +4 9 VIII
78 platinum Pt −3, −2, −1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6 (a mildly basic oxide) +2, +4 10 VIII
79 gold Au −3, −2, −1, 0,[55] +1, +2, +3, +5 (an amphoteric oxide) +1, +3 11 I
80 mercury Hg −2 , +1, +2 (a mildly basic oxide) +1, +2 12 II
81 thallium Tl −5,[56] −2, −1, +1, +2, +3 (a mildly basic oxide) +1, +3 13 III
82 lead Pb −4, −2, −1, +1, +2, +3, +4 (an amphoteric oxide) +2, +4 14 IV
83 bismuth Bi −3, −2, −1, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5 (a mildly acidic oxide) +3 15 V
84 polonium Po −2, +2, +4, +5,[57] +6 (an amphoteric oxide) −2, +2, +4 16 VI
85 astatine At −1, +1, +3, +5, +7[58] −1, +1 17 VII
86 radon Rn 0, +2, +6 0 18 0
87 francium Fr +1 (a strongly basic oxide) +1 1 I
88 radium Ra +2 (expected to have a strongly basic oxide) +2 2 II
89 actinium Ac +3 (a strongly basic oxide) +3 n/a -
90 thorium Th +1, +2, +3, +4 (a weakly basic oxide) +4 n/a -
91 protactinium Pa +2, +3, +4, +5 (a weakly basic oxide) +5 n/a -
92 uranium U +1, +2, +3,[59] +4, +5, +6 (an amphoteric oxide) +4, +6 n/a -
93 neptunium Np +2, +3, +4,[60] +5, +6, +7 (an amphoteric oxide) +5 n/a -
94 plutonium Pu +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7, +8 (an amphoteric oxide) +4 n/a -
95 americium Am +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, +7 (an amphoteric oxide) +3 n/a -
96 curium Cm +3, +4, +5,[61] +6[62] (an amphoteric oxide) +3 n/a -
97 berkelium Bk +2, +3, +4, +5[61] +3 n/a -
98 californium Cf +2, +3, +4, +5[63][61] +3 n/a -
99 einsteinium Es +2, +3, +4 +3 n/a -
100 fermium Fm +2, +3 +3 n/a -
101 mendelevium Md +2, +3 +3 n/a -
102 nobelium No +2, +3 +2 n/a -
103 lawrencium Lr +3 +3 3 III
104 rutherfordium Rf (+2), (+3), +4[64][65][2] (parenthesized: prediction) (+3), +4 (parenthesized: prediction) 4 IV
105 dubnium Db (+3), (+4), +5[65][2] (parenthesized: prediction) +5 5 V
106 seaborgium Sg 0, (+3), (+4), (+5), +6[65][2] (parenthesized: prediction) (+4), +6 (parenthesized: prediction) 6 VI
107 bohrium Bh (+3), (+4), (+5), +7[65][2] (parenthesized: prediction) (+3), (+4), (+5), +7 (parenthesized: prediction) 7 VII
108 hassium Hs (+2), (+3), (+4), (+6), +8[1][2][3] (parenthesized: prediction) (+3), (+4) (parenthesized: prediction) 8 VIII
109 meitnerium Mt (+1), (+3), (+4), (+6), (+8), (+9) (predicted)[65][66][67][2] (+1), (+3), (+6) (predicted) 9 VIII
110 darmstadtium Ds (0), (+2), (+4), (+6), (+8) (predicted)[65][2] (0), (+2), (+8) (predicted) 10 VIII
111 roentgenium Rg (−1), (+1), (+3), (+5), (+7) (predicted)[65][2][68] (+3) (predicted) 11 I
112 copernicium Cn 0, (+1), +2, (+4) (parenthesized: prediction)[65][69][2] 0, +2 12 II
113 nihonium Nh (−1), (+1), (+3), (+5) (predicted)[65][2][70] (+1), (+3) (predicted) 13 III
114 flerovium Fl (0), (+1), (+2), (+4), (+6) (predicted)[65][2][71] (+2) (predicted) 14 IV
115 moscovium Mc (+1), (+3) (predicted)[65][2] (+1), (+3) (predicted) 15 V
116 livermorium Lv (−2),[72] (+2), (+4) (predicted)[65] (+2) (predicted) 16 VI
117 tennessine Ts (−1), (+1), (+3), (+5) (predicted)[2][65] (+1), (+3) (predicted) 17 VII
118 oganesson Og (−1),[65] (0), (+1),[73] (+2),[74] (+4),[74] (+6)[65] (predicted) (+2), (+4) (predicted) 18 0
119 ununennium Uue (+1), (+3) (predicted)[65] (+1) (predicted) 1 I
120 unbinilium Ubn (+1),[75] (+2), (+4) (predicted)[65] (+2) (predicted) 2 II
121 unbiunium Ubu (+1), (+3) (predicted)[65][76] (+3) (predicted) -
122 unbibium Ubb (+4) (predicted)[77] (+4) (predicted) -
123 unbitrium Ubt (+5) (predicted)[77] (+5) (predicted) -
124 unbiquadium Ubq (+6) (predicted)[77] (+6) (predicted) -
125 unbipentium Ubp (+1), (+6), (+7) (predicted)[77] (+6), (+7) (predicted) -
126 unbihexium Ubh (+1), (+2), (+4), (+6), (+8) (predicted)[77] (+4), (+6), (+8) (predicted) -

References[change source]

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|comment= options (as of November 2018):
comment=acidic (an acidic oxide)
comment=mildly acidic (a mildly acidic oxide)
comment=strongly acidic (a strongly acidic oxide)
comment=amphoteric (an amphoteric oxide)
comment=basic (a basic oxide)
comment=weakly basic (a weakly basic oxide)
comment=mildly basic (a mildly basic oxide)
comment=strongly basic (a strongly basic oxide)
comment=strongly basic expected (expected to have a strongly basic oxide) -- Ra
comment=oxidizes oxygen (oxidizes oxygen) -- F
comment=depending (depending on the oxidation state, an acidic, basic, or amphoteric oxide) -- Cr, Mn
comment=rarely non-0, weakly acidic (rarely more than 0; a weakly acidic oxide) -- Xe
comment=rarely non-0, unk oxide (rarely more than 0; oxide is unknown) -- Kr
 
comment=parenthesized (parenthesized: prediction)
comment=predicted (predicted)
comment=<any text> <any text>, including blank
 
WP:ENGVAR (set |engvar= in article page)
By default, element articles (and so infoboxes) are in en-US.
In article space, one can call an infobox with |engvar=en-GB, en-OED, which changes these spellings
comment=parenthesized
|engvar= (parenthesized: prediction)
|engvar=en-US (default) (parenthesized: prediction)
|engvar=en-GB (brackets: prediction)
|engvar=en-OED (brackets: prediction)
|engvar=en-FOO (parenthesized: prediction)


See also[change source]

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