Fritz Haber

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Fritz Haber, c. 1919

Fritz Haber (9 December 1868 – 29 January 1934) was a German chemist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918. The prize was for his invention of the Haber–Bosch process, a method used in industry to synthesise ammonia from nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas. He is also considered the "father of chemical warfare." This is because Haber spent years of work developing and making chlorine and other poisonous gases into weapons during World War I.

Haber was born in Breslau, Prussia (now Wrocław, Poland). He was Jewish. On 29 January 1934, he died of a heart attack in Basel, Switzerland. He was 64.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Fritz Haber". Britannica.com. Retrieved 19 March 2020.

Other websites[change | change source]