Genkyō

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Genkyō (元亨?), also Genkō, was a Japanese era name (年号, nengō,?, lit. "year name") after Gen'ō and before Shōchū.[1] This period started in February 1321[2] and ended in December 1324.[3] The reigning Emperor was Go-Daigo-tennō (後醍醐天皇?).[4]

Events of the Genkyō era[change | edit source]

  • 1321 (Genkyō 1, 2nd month): Saionji Kinakira died. He was Minister of the Right (udaijin).[5]
  • 1321 (Genkyō 1, 4th month): The former-Emperor Go-Uda ordered the construction of a small chapel at Daikaku-ji where he lived in retirement.[5]
  • 1321 (Genkyō 1, 5th month): The emperor visited Dikaku-ji to see this new chapel for himself.[5]
  • 1321 (Genkyō 1, 6th month): Hōjō Kanetoki (北条兼時?) died. He was the military governor (鎮西探題 Chinzei-tandai?) in Kyushu.[5]
  • 1321 (Genkyō 1, 12th month): Hōjō Norisada was named governor of Kyoto; and Hōjō Hidetoki was named military governor of Kyūshū.[5]
  • 1322 (Genkyō 2, 1st month): The emperor visited the former-Emperor Go-Uda at Daikau-ji; and he was entertained by a musical concert.[6]
  • 1322 (Genkyō 2, 1st month): Saionji Sanekane died at age 74.[6]
  • 1322 (Genkyō 3, 3rd month): Ichijō Uchitsune lost his position as Chancellor (kampaku); and Kujō Fusazane was given this office.[6]
  • 16 July 1324 (Genkyō 4, 25th day of the 6th month): Former-Emperor Go-Uda died at age 58.[7]

Related pages[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]

  1. Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Nengō" in Japan Encyclopedia, pp. 704-705.
  2. Nussbaum, "Gen'ō" at p. 238.
  3. Nussbaum, "Shōchū" at p. 877.
  4. Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du Japon, pp. 278-281; Varley, H. Paul. (1980). Jinnō Shōtōki. pp. 239-241.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Titsingh, p. 282.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Titsingh, p. 283.
  7. Titsingh, p. 284; Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō), (後宇多天皇 (91); retrieved 2012-5-22.

Other websites[change | edit source]


Genkyō 1st 2nd 3rd 4th
1321 1322 1323 1324
Preceded by:
Gen'ō
Era or nengō:
Genkyō
Succeeded by:
Shōchū