Chase County, Kansas

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Chase County
Chase County Courthouse in Cottonwood Falls
Map of Kansas highlighting Chase County
Location within the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: Coordinates: 38°18′N 96°35′W / 38.300°N 96.583°W / 38.300; -96.583
Country United States
State Kansas
FoundedFebruary 11, 1859
Named forSalmon P. Chase
SeatCottonwood Falls
Largest cityCottonwood Falls
Area
 • Total778 sq mi (2,020 km2)
 • Land773 sq mi (2,000 km2)
 • Water4.7 sq mi (12 km2)  0.6%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2016)
2,669
 • Density3.6/sq mi (1.4/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Area code620
Congressional district1st
Websitechasecountychamber.org

Chase County (county code CS) is a county in the U.S. state of Kansas. In 2010, 2,790 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Cottonwood Falls. Cottonwood Falls is also the biggest city in Chase County.[2] The center of population of Kansas is in Chase County, about four miles north of Strong City.

History[change | change source]

In 1859, Chase County was created in the Kansas Territory.

In 1871, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway built a railroad from Emporia to Newton.[3] In 1887, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway built a railroad from Neva (3 miles west of Strong City) to Superior, Nebraska. This railroad connected Strong City, Neva, Rockland, Diamond Springs, Burdick, Lost Springs, Jacobs, Hope, Navarre, Enterprise, Abilene, Talmage, Manchester, Longford, Oak Hill, Miltonvale, Aurora, Huscher, Concordia, Kackley, Courtland, Webber, Superior.

The south-western border one mile "notch" into Marion County was created under strange circumstances. There was a murder. Marion County didn't want to have the trial, so a section one mile wide and eighteen miles long was given to Chase County. This was to make it so that the murder had happened there.[4] The one mile strip of land is still part of Chase County.

Historical markers[change | change source]

  • Landmark of Distinction - The Chase County Courthouse.[5]
  • Chase County and The Bluestem Pasture Region of Kansas.[6]
  • The Bluestem Pasture Region of Kansas.[7]
  • W. B. Strong Memorial Railroad Park.[8]

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has a total area of 778 square miles (2,020 km2). Of that, 773 square miles (2,000 km2) is land and 4.7 square miles (12 km2) (0.6%) is water.[9]

Major highways[change | change source]

Sources: National Atlas,[10] U.S. Census Bureau[11]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18601,046
18701,97588.8%
18806,081207.9%
18908,23335.4%
19008,2460.2%
19107,527−8.7%
19207,144−5.1%
19306,952−2.7%
19406,345−8.7%
19504,831−23.9%
19603,921−18.8%
19703,408−13.1%
19803,309−2.9%
19903,021−8.7%
20003,0300.3%
20102,790−7.9%
Est. 20162,669[13]−4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
1790-1960[15] 1900-1990[16]
1990-2000[17] 2010-2016[1]

Government[change | change source]

Presidential elections[change | change source]

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 70.8% 969 23.1% 316 6.1% 84
2012 68.8% 875 28.2% 358 3.0% 38
2008 70.5% 976 27.7% 383 1.8% 25
2004 70.3% 1,055 27.9% 418 1.9% 28
2000 64.4% 848 29.7% 391 5.9% 78
1996 50.2% 778 32.0% 496 17.8% 276
1992 36.2% 610 27.9% 470 35.9% 605
1988 60.6% 884 36.9% 538 2.5% 36
1984 74.0% 1,162 25.0% 393 1.0% 15
1980 66.9% 1,073 25.8% 413 7.3% 117
1976 57.6% 922 40.2% 643 2.3% 36
1972 76.0% 1,184 20.2% 315 3.7% 58
1968 62.6% 1,038 27.9% 462 9.5% 158
1964 50.3% 902 49.4% 886 0.3% 5
1960 64.1% 1,276 35.5% 708 0.4% 8
1956 74.5% 1,553 25.4% 529 0.2% 4
1952 77.8% 1,815 22.0% 513 0.3% 6
1948 58.9% 1,432 39.6% 961 1.5% 37
1944 60.0% 1,510 39.7% 998 0.4% 9
1940 57.8% 1,871 41.5% 1,344 0.7% 23
1936 48.4% 1,610 51.3% 1,706 0.3% 9
1932 46.0% 1,485 52.7% 1,703 1.3% 43
1928 72.8% 2,079 25.9% 739 1.3% 38
1924 62.6% 1,822 26.1% 758 11.3% 330
1920 63.2% 1,659 34.4% 904 2.4% 64
1916 44.1% 1,356 51.6% 1,584 4.3% 132
1912 25.4% 476 43.4% 812 31.2% 585
1908 53.0% 1,021 43.3% 834 3.6% 70
1904 64.4% 1,217 29.7% 562 5.9% 111
1900 52.5% 1,084 46.3% 956 1.2% 25
1896 44.7% 812 54.1% 981 1.2% 22
1892 47.4% 891 52.7% 990
1888 54.1% 1,126 28.5% 593 17.4% 362

Education[change | change source]

Unified school districts[change | change source]

District Office In Neighboring County

Communities[change | change source]

2005 KDOT Map of Chase County (map legend)

Cities[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. Santa Fe Rail History
  4. Kansas State Historical Society - Marion County
  5. A Landmark of Distinction - The Chase County Courthouse; Historical Marker; Blue Skyways (archived).
  6. Chase County & The Bluestem Pasture Region of Kansas; Historical Marker; Blue Skyways (archived).
  7. The Bluestem Pasture Region of Kansas; Historical Marker; Blue Skyways (archived).
  8. W. B. Strong Memorial Railroad Park; Historical Marker; Blue Skyways (archived).
  9. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. National Atlas Archived December 5, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  11. "U.S. Census Bureau TIGER shape files". Archived from the original on 2017-05-23. Retrieved 2017-12-05. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  12. Google Maps Street View
  13. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  14. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 22, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  15. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  16. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  17. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  18. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

More reading[change | change source]

  • William Least Heat-Moon. PrairyErth (A Deep Map). Mariner Books; Reissue edition (February 15, 1999). ISBN 9780395925690.
  • Chase County - Its Past, Present, and Future; Chase County Leader; May 28, 1914.
  • Plat Book of Chase County, Kansas; North West Publishing Co; 39 pages; 1901.

Other websites[change | change source]