Grant County, Kansas

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Grant County
Grant County courthouse in Ulysses
Grant County courthouse in Ulysses
Map of Kansas highlighting Grant County
Location within the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°35′00″N 101°19′59″W / 37.5833°N 101.333°W / 37.5833; -101.333
Country United States
State Kansas
FoundedMarch 20, 1873
Named forUlysses S. Grant
SeatUlysses
Largest cityUlysses
Area
 • Total575 sq mi (1,490 km2)
 • Land575 sq mi (1,490 km2)
 • Water0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)  0.06%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2016)
7,646
 • Density14/sq mi (5/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
WebsiteGrantCoKS.org

Grant County (county code GT) is a county in the U.S. state of Kansas. In 2010, 7,829 people lived there.[1] Its county seat and only city is Ulysses.[2]

History[change | change source]

In 1873, the part of Kansas that is west of Range 25 was divided into 25 new counties. The new counties were Decatur, Rawlins, Cheyenne, Sheridan, Thomas, Sherman, Lane, Buffalo, Foote, Meade, Scott, Sequoyah, Arapahoe, Seward, Wichita, Kearny, Greeley, Hamilton, Stanton, Kansas, Stevens, and Grant.[3]

Grant County, Kansas was named after Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). He was incumbent president at the time of the county's creation.[4] The initial survey creating the county borders was in the summer of 1874.[4]

In 1883, Kearny, Sequoyah, Arapahoe, Kansas, Stevens, Meade, Clark and Grant counties disappeared. Hamilton, Ford, Seward, and Hodgeman counties became bigger, and Finney County was created. Grant County was split with the western part becoming a part of Hamilton County and the eastern part becoming a part of the newly-created Finney County.[3]

On June 9, 1888, Grant County was created again as a Kansas county, with original county borders. The first officers of the new Grant County were sworn in on June 18, 1888.[3]

Grant County, Kansas Historical Map 1905-1915.
Legend: Green Lines = present highways, Purple circles = springs, at least in wet years, Blue = creeks, major ravines, & river basins, Gold dot triangles = Indian camps, burial sites, Red 1 = Military Redoubt, Red 2 = "Old" Ulysses. Red 3 = Surprise-Tilden, Red 4 = Cincinnati-Appomattox, Red 5 = Lawson, Red 6 = Waterford, Red 7 = Zionville, Red 8 = Golden, Red 9 = Spanish sword found, Red 10 = Shockeyville, Red 11 = "New" Ulysses

In October 1888, the county seat election for Grant County resulted in victory for Ulysses, Kansas. The election results were:.[3]

Town Name Vote count
Ulysses 578
Appomattox 268
Shockeyville 41
Golswn 31
Spurgeon 2

Early Settlements[change | change source]

  • "Old" Ulysses, then moved to New Ulysses in 1909[4]
  • Surprise-Tilden[4]
  • Cincinnati-Appomattox[4]
  • Shockey (Shockeyville)[4]
  • Golden[4]
  • Zionville[4]
  • Lawson[4]
  • Waterford[4]
  • Gognac[4]
  • Spurgeon[4]

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has a total area of 575 square miles (1,490 km2). Of that, 575 square miles (1,490 km2) is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) (0.06%) is water.[5]

Major highways[change | change source]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18901,308
1900422−67.7%
19101,087157.6%
19201,0870.0%
19303,092184.5%
19401,946−37.1%
19504,638138.3%
19605,26913.6%
19705,96113.1%
19806,97717.0%
19907,1592.6%
20007,90910.5%
20107,829−1.0%
Est. 20167,646[6]−2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2016[1]

Government[change | change source]

Presidential elections[change | change source]

Grant County is very republican. Lyndon B. Johnson was the last democrat to win the county, and Jimmy Carter barely lost the county in 1976.

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 75.5% 1,804 18.5% 441 6.0% 144
2012 78.5% 1,811 19.8% 456 1.7% 39
2008 75.0% 1,995 23.9% 635 1.2% 31
2004 78.6% 2,169 20.3% 561 1.0% 28
2000 74.4% 2,126 23.9% 683 1.7% 47
1996 66.5% 1,772 23.8% 633 9.7% 259
1992 51.7% 1,561 20.5% 619 27.8% 839
1988 63.7% 1,654 34.9% 907 1.4% 36
1984 76.3% 2,043 23.0% 615 0.8% 21
1980 66.0% 1,711 26.4% 683 7.6% 198
1976 50.6% 1,226 47.5% 1,151 1.9% 45
1972 73.2% 1,469 23.7% 476 3.1% 62
1968 57.2% 1,121 31.5% 618 11.3% 222
1964 41.0% 727 57.6% 1,023 1.4% 25
1960 63.6% 1,235 36.2% 702 0.3% 5
1956 69.5% 1,058 30.1% 459 0.4% 6
1952 71.0% 1,277 27.9% 502 1.1% 19
1948 53.3% 742 44.9% 625 1.7% 24
1944 66.4% 566 33.1% 282 0.6% 5
1940 61.0% 614 38.0% 382 1.0% 10
1936 43.6% 476 56.4% 616 0.0% 0
1932 33.7% 395 62.9% 737 3.4% 40
1928 76.4% 635 22.3% 185 1.3% 11
1924 67.1% 459 21.6% 148 11.3% 77
1920 73.7% 339 23.5% 108 2.8% 13
1916 44.5% 200 46.3% 208 9.1% 41
1912 20.8% 56 29.7% 80 49.4% 133
1908 54.8% 178 40.9% 133 4.3% 14
1904 65.9% 81 28.5% 35 5.7% 7
1900 51.8% 58 47.3% 53 0.9% 1
1896 46.0% 51 54.1% 60 0.0% 0
1892 53.6% 151 46.5% 131
1888 50.5% 390 31.7% 245 17.9% 138

Education[change | change source]

Unified school districts[change | change source]

Communities[change | change source]

2005 KDOT Map of Grant County (map legend)

City[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Ulysses 1885-1909 From Boom to Bust; compiled by The Historic Adobe Museum Staff of Ulysses, Kansas; 2009.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 Bessire, Fern (1982). Grant County, Kansas. Grant County History Commission.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  11. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

Other websites[change | change source]

County
Maps

Coordinates: 37°35′N 101°20′W / 37.583°N 101.333°W / 37.583; -101.333