Dickinson County, Kansas

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Dickinson County
Map of Kansas highlighting Dickinson County
Location within the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: Coordinates: 38°53′N 97°10′W / 38.883°N 97.167°W / 38.883; -97.167
Country United States
State Kansas
FoundedFebruary 20, 1857
Named forDaniel S. Dickinson
SeatAbilene
Largest cityAbilene
Area
 • Total852 sq mi (2,210 km2)
 • Land847 sq mi (2,190 km2)
 • Water4.9 sq mi (13 km2)  0.6%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2016)
19,064
 • Density23/sq mi (9/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Area code785
Congressional district1st
WebsiteDkCoKS.org

Dickinson County (county code DK) is a county in Central Kansas. In 2010, 19,754 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Abilene. Abilene is also the biggest city in Dickinson County.[2] The county was named after Daniel S. Dickinson.[3]

History[change | change source]

19th century[change | change source]

1915-1918 railroad map of Dickinson County

In 1857, Dickinson County was created.

The first railroad in Dickinson County was built through it in 1866.[4]

In 1887, the Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway built a railroad from Topeka to Herington.[5] This main line connected Topeka, Valencia, Willard, Maple Hill, Vera, Paxico, McFarland, Alma, Volland, Alta Vista, Dwight, White City, Latimer, Herington.

21st century[change | change source]

In 2010, the Keystone-Cushing Pipeline (Phase II) was built through Dickinson County. There was a lot of controversy about tax exemption and environmental concerns.[6][7]

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has an area of 852 square miles (2,210 km2). Of that, 847 square miles (2,190 km2) is land and 4.9 square miles (13 km2) (0.6%) is water.[8]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860378
18703,043705.0%
188015,251401.2%
189022,27346.0%
190021,816−2.1%
191024,36111.7%
192025,7775.8%
193025,8700.4%
194022,929−11.4%
195021,190−7.6%
196021,5721.8%
197019,993−7.3%
198020,1750.9%
199018,958−6.0%
200019,3442.0%
201019,7542.1%
Est. 201619,064[9]−3.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2016[1]

Government[change | change source]

Presidential elections[change | change source]

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 73.4% 6,029 19.6% 1,609 7.0% 572
2012 72.5% 5,832 25.1% 2,020 2.4% 190
2008 70.2% 6,081 28.0% 2,422 1.9% 164
2004 71.6% 6,295 26.9% 2,364 1.5% 132
2000 64.8% 5,243 29.8% 2,413 5.4% 436
1996 60.5% 5,174 28.4% 2,423 11.1% 951
1992 41.8% 3,851 27.3% 2,518 30.9% 2,852
1988 63.3% 5,121 35.5% 2,870 1.3% 101
1984 74.0% 6,487 24.7% 2,168 1.3% 116
1980 67.6% 5,654 25.2% 2,108 7.1% 597
1976 55.2% 4,759 42.6% 3,672 2.2% 186
1972 75.3% 6,515 22.6% 1,957 2.0% 175
1968 64.3% 5,574 27.7% 2,399 8.0% 693
1964 53.2% 4,704 46.0% 4,070 0.8% 73
1960 69.2% 6,956 30.4% 3,054 0.5% 45
1956 74.9% 7,422 24.8% 2,452 0.3% 34
1952 81.8% 8,969 17.9% 1,967 0.3% 31
1948 60.0% 5,918 38.7% 3,815 1.4% 134
1944 65.9% 6,227 33.8% 3,190 0.3% 29
1940 63.3% 6,931 36.1% 3,957 0.6% 70
1936 52.6% 5,936 47.1% 5,313 0.3% 34
1932 49.0% 5,320 49.2% 5,339 1.8% 190
1928 77.0% 7,758 22.3% 2,246 0.7% 66
1924 64.6% 6,178 17.7% 1,690 17.8% 1,698
1920 69.1% 5,761 28.6% 2,387 2.3% 189
1916 45.1% 4,323 51.9% 4,974 3.1% 296
1912 18.3% 988 40.4% 2,182 41.2% 2,225[a]
1908 53.3% 2,886 42.2% 2,282 4.6% 246
1904 66.9% 3,185 25.6% 1,219 7.5% 358
1900 52.9% 2,771 44.9% 2,352 2.1% 112
1896 48.3% 2,291 50.6% 2,399 1.1% 52
1892 47.1% 2,419 52.9% 2,712
1888 54.2% 2,746 33.4% 1,695 12.4% 630

Education[change | change source]

Unified school districts[change | change source]

District Office In Neighboring County

Communities[change | change source]

2005 KDOT Map of Dickinson County (map legend)

Cities[change | change source]

Famous people[change | change source]

On April 15, 1871, Wild Bill Hickok became marshal of Abilene after its previous marshal was shot and killed.

Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States from 1953 until 1961. He moved to Abilene when he was 2 years old. Prior to that he was a five-star general in the United States Army. He was Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe World War II. He planned the invasion of North Africa in Operation Torch in 1942–43 and the invasion of France and Germany in 1944–45.[15] The Eisenhower Library is in Abilene.

Joe Engle is a retired U.S. Air Force colonel and a former NASA astronaut.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 12, 2011. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 106.
  4. Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. p. 519.
  5. Rock Island Rail History
  6. Keystone Pipeline - Marion County Commission calls out Legislative Leadership on Pipeline Deal; April 18, 2010. Archived October 22, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  7. Keystone Pipeline - TransCanada inspecting pipeline; December 10, 2010.
  8. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  9. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  11. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  12. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  13. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  14. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  15. "Former SACEURs". Aco.nato.int. Archived from the original on July 28, 2012. Retrieved January 26, 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
Notes
  1. Includes 1,937 votes (35.9%) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt and 288 votes (5.3%) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs.

More reading[change | change source]

County
Trails

Other websites[change | change source]

County
Historical
Maps