Ford County, Kansas

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Ford County, Kansas
County
Ford county kansas courthouse 2000.jpg
Ford County Courthouse in Dodge City
Location within Kansas
Location within Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 26, 1867
Named forJames Ford
SeatDodge City
Largest cityDodge City
Area
 • Total1,099 sq mi (2,846 km2)
 • Land1,098 sq mi (2,844 km2)
 • Water0.8 sq mi (2 km2), 0.07%
Population (est.)
 • (2016)33,971
 • Density31/sq mi (12/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneCentral: UTC−6/−5
WebsiteFordCounty.net

Ford County (county code FO) is a county in the U.S. state of Kansas. In 2010, 33,848 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Dodge City. Dodge City is also the biggest city in Ford County.[2] The county is named after Colonel James Hobart Ford.[3]

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has a total area of 1,099 square miles (2,850 km2). Of that, 1,098 square miles (2,840 km2) is land and 0.8 square miles (2.1 km2) (0.07%) is water.[4]

People[change | change source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1870427
18803,122631.1%
18905,30870.0%
19005,4973.6%
191011,393107.3%
192014,27325.3%
193020,64744.7%
194017,254−16.4%
195019,67014.0%
196020,9386.4%
197022,5877.9%
198024,3157.7%
199027,46312.9%
200032,45818.2%
201033,8484.3%
Est. 201633,971[5]4.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2016[1]

The Dodge City Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Ford County.

The 2010 census[10] says that there were 33,848 people, 10,852 households, and 7,856 families living in Ford County. 75.3% of the people were White, 2.1% were Black or African American, 1.0% Native American, 1.4% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 17.8% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 51.2% of the population.

Government[change | change source]

Presidential elections[change | change source]

Ford County has been strongly Republican for most of its history, especially in recent elections. Only eight Democratic presidential candidates from 1888 to the present day have won the county. The most recent winner being Jimmy Carter in 1976.

Presidential election results
Presidential election results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 66.3% 5,114 27.8% 2,149 5.9% 455
2012 67.0% 5,602 31.1% 2,600 1.9% 160
2008 64.6% 5,730 33.7% 2,991 1.6% 143
2004 73.6% 6,632 25.4% 2,286 1.1% 98
2000 67.9% 6,050 28.8% 2,566 3.4% 301
1996 61.3% 5,681 28.4% 2,628 10.3% 958
1992 41.9% 4,342 25.4% 2,635 32.6% 3,379
1988 58.6% 5,685 39.4% 3,817 2.0% 195
1984 69.7% 6,935 29.3% 2,914 1.0% 98
1980 58.9% 5,686 33.1% 3,194 8.1% 781
1976 47.6% 4,679 50.2% 4,934 2.2% 214
1972 67.1% 6,232 30.2% 2,804 2.7% 249
1968 52.8% 4,645 36.3% 3,191 10.9% 961
1964 39.7% 3,481 59.6% 5,221 0.7% 59
1960 57.7% 5,200 42.1% 3,792 0.3% 25
1956 66.8% 5,561 32.6% 2,710 0.6% 49
1952 69.0% 6,359 29.8% 2,748 1.2% 114
1948 47.2% 4,089 50.8% 4,396 2.0% 177
1944 57.2% 4,110 41.7% 2,994 1.1% 77
1940 52.0% 4,356 47.2% 3,954 0.9% 72
1936 38.7% 3,378 61.1% 5,335 0.2% 17
1932 41.6% 3,335 55.4% 4,442 3.0% 238
1928 71.6% 4,893 27.4% 1,870 1.1% 72
1924 58.0% 3,449 26.1% 1,551 15.9% 948
1920 61.9% 3,305 35.2% 1,879 2.9% 155
1916 40.3% 2,337 52.5% 3,044 7.2% 420
1912 19.2% 529 40.8% 1,125 40.0% 1,104
1908 53.3% 1,333 43.5% 1,089 3.2% 80
1904 64.8% 1,148 29.7% 526 5.5% 98
1900 50.5% 653 47.1% 610 2.4% 31
1896 45.8% 555 53.0% 643 1.2% 15
1892 53.4% 648 46.6% 565
1888 52.5% 882 37.5% 630 10.1% 169

Laws[change | change source]

Railroad crew works on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe tracks near Bellefont, 1974. Photo by Charles O'Rear.

Ford County was a prohibition, or "dry", county until the Kansas Constitution was changed in 1986. The changed allowed liquor to be sold.[12]


References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2015-05-09. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 128.
  4. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  10. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2018-10-19.
  11. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  12. "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2007-12-28.