Gove County, Kansas

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Gove County
Historic Opera House in Grainfield
Map of Kansas highlighting Gove County
Location within the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°55′12″N 100°29′48″W / 38.92°N 100.4967°W / 38.92; -100.4967
Country United States
State Kansas
FoundedMarch 11, 1868
Named forGrenville L. Gove
SeatGove City
Largest cityQuinter
Area
 • Total1,072 sq mi (2,780 km2)
 • Land1,072 sq mi (2,780 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)  0.01%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2016)
2,589
 • Density2.5/sq mi (1.0/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitegovecountyks.com

Gove County (county code GO) is a county in the U.S. state of Kansas. In 2010, 2,695 people lived there.[1] Its county seat is Gove City.[2] Its biggest city is Quinter.

History[change | change source]

19th century[change | change source]

In 1868, Gove County was created. It was named after Granville Llewellyn Gove, member of the 11th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. He was also the son of Moses Gove, a former mayor of Manhattan, Kansas.[3][4]

Geography[change | change source]

The U.S. Census Bureau says that the county has an area of 1,072 square miles (2,780 km2). Of that, 1,072 square miles (2,780 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.01%) is water.[5]

People[change | change source]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,196
18902,994150.3%
19002,441−18.5%
19106,044147.6%
19204,748−21.4%
19305,64318.9%
19404,793−15.1%
19504,447−7.2%
19604,107−7.6%
19703,940−4.1%
19803,726−5.4%
19903,231−13.3%
20003,068−5.0%
20102,695−12.2%
Est. 20162,589[6]−3.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2016[1]

Government[change | change source]

Presidential elections[change | change source]

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 84.9% 1,140 11.1% 149 4.0% 54
2012 84.5% 1,168 12.7% 176 2.8% 39
2008 80.1% 1,136 18.4% 261 1.5% 21
2004 81.5% 1,196 16.8% 247 1.6% 24
2000 75.1% 1,122 19.8% 296 5.2% 77
1996 69.2% 1,123 21.6% 351 9.2% 149
1992 46.4% 792 22.2% 379 31.4% 535
1988 57.4% 966 39.4% 663 3.3% 55
1984 73.4% 1,310 23.9% 426 2.7% 48
1980 71.1% 1,263 22.3% 396 6.6% 117
1976 49.0% 860 48.3% 848 2.8% 49
1972 69.9% 1,226 26.6% 466 3.6% 63
1968 59.1% 1,018 31.2% 538 9.7% 168
1964 42.7% 774 56.4% 1,022 0.9% 17
1960 55.9% 1,065 43.4% 828 0.7% 14
1956 72.3% 1,315 27.1% 492 0.7% 12
1952 75.8% 1,453 23.6% 453 0.5% 10
1948 57.5% 1,030 40.1% 719 2.4% 43
1944 72.0% 1,125 26.9% 420 1.1% 17
1940 66.3% 1,352 32.3% 659 1.4% 28
1936 49.8% 1,107 49.0% 1,090 1.3% 28
1932 45.8% 1,043 52.0% 1,186 2.2% 51
1928 71.0% 1,470 28.5% 590 0.6% 12
1924 67.8% 1,211 22.4% 400 9.9% 176
1920 74.9% 950 22.5% 285 2.6% 33
1916 40.1% 642 53.8% 862 6.1% 98
1912 18.6% 170 38.8% 355 42.7% 391[a]
1908 55.2% 632 39.8% 456 5.1% 58
1904 63.2% 470 27.4% 204 9.4% 70
1900 58.4% 368 40.2% 253 1.4% 9
1896 55.4% 279 40.5% 204 4.2% 21
1892 56.9% 327 43.1% 248
1888 65.8% 586 31.2% 278 2.9% 26

Laws[change | change source]

Although the Kansas Constitution was changed in 1986 to allow the sale of alcohol, Gove County is still a "dry" county.[12]

Education[change | change source]

Unified school districts[change | change source]

Attractions[change | change source]

Communities[change | change source]

2005 KDOT Map of Gove County (map legend)

Cities[change | change source]

Gallery[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 6, 2011. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 140.
  4. Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc. Standard Publishing Company. p. 768.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2014. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  9. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  10. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 24, 2014.
  11. http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  12. "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2004. Archived from the original on 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2007-01-21. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
Notes
  1. This total comprises 356 votes (38.86 percent) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt (who carried the county) and 35 votes (3.82 percent) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs.

More reading[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]

County
Maps

Coordinates: 38°55′N 100°29′W / 38.917°N 100.483°W / 38.917; -100.483