1990s

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Hubble Space TelescopeGulf WarOslo AccordsWorld Wide WebDissolution of the Soviet UnionDolly the sheepDeath of Diana, Princess of WalesRwandan genocide
From left, clockwise: The Hubble Space Telescope orbits the Earth after it was launched in 1990; American F-16s and F-15s fly over burning oil fields in Operation Desert Storm, also known as the 1991 Gulf War; The signing of the Oslo Accords on 13 September 1993; The World Wide Web becomes more popular worldwide; Boris Yeltsin and followers stand on a tank against the August Coup, which leads to the end of the Soviet Union on 26 December 1991; Dolly the sheep is the first mammal to be cloned from an adult somatic cell; The funeral procession of Diana, Princess of Wales, who dies in 1997 from a car crash in Paris, and is mourned by millions; Hundreds of thousands of Tutsi people are killed in the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century20th century21st century
Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s1990s2000s 2010s 2020s
Years: 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

The 1990s was the decade that started on January 1, 1990, and ended on December 31, 1999.

Events[change | change source]

People[change | change source]

Anime[change | change source]

Anime was popular in the 1980s, and expanded to a worldwide audience by the 1990s, for its expansive spectrum of story subjects and themes not limited to comedy and superhero action found in the US, and well produced, and well written, visual and story content that came to showcase animation's potential for emotional and intellectual depth and integrity on par with live action media to its viewers, and which also expanded to older and adult ages in the medium of animation. TV shows such as Sailor Moon, Digimon, Pokémon, Tenchi Muyo!, Detective Conan, Dragon Ball Z, Gundam Wing, Neon Genesis Evangelion, Ranma ½, Dirty Pair, Slayers, Rurouni Kenshin, Initial D, Gunsmith Cats, Outlaw Star and VeggieTales (including 3-2-1 Penguins! and Larryboy) to anime movies such as Akira, Vampire Hunter D, My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, Castle in the Sky, The Castle of Cagliostro, and imports by various distributors such as Viz, AnimEigo, Central Park Media, A.D. Vision, Pioneer Entertainment, Media Blasters, Manga Entertainment, Celebrity, and Big Idea to rebranding Big Idea Tokyo (now owned by 20th Century Fox (Paramount) for $75,000,000 for cash) helped begin the mid to late 1990s and turn of the millennium introductory anime craze in the US, and the Cartoon Network anime block Toonami in 1997, and Big Idea Tokyo's VeggieTales, 3-2-1 Penguins! and Larryboy: The Cartoon Adventures DVDs owned by 20th Century Fox from Paramount in Japan by 2031.