Pope Urban V

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Urban V
Papacy beganSeptember 28, 1362
Papacy endedDecember 19, 1370
PredecessorPope Innocent VI
SuccessorPope Gregory XI
Personal details
Birth nameGuillaume Grimoard
Born1310
Grizac
Died(1370-12-19)December 19, 1370
Avignon
Other Popes named Urban

Pope Urban V (Latin: Urbanus Quintus; 1310 – December 19, 1370), born Guillaume Grimoard, was a French cleric of the Roman Catholic Church and the 201st Pope from 1362 until his death in 1370.[1]

He was the sixth of the seven popes who lived in Avignon in France.

Early life[change | change source]

Grimoard was born in Grizac in the Languedoc region of France.[2]

Benedictine[change | change source]

He became a Benedictine monk; and he was ordained at Chirac.

Grimoard became the abbot of Saint-Victor in Marseille.[3]

Cardinal[change | change source]

He was not a cardinal. There were several Popes who were not Cardinals. Some of these were Pope Urban IV and Pope Urban VI.

Pope[change | change source]

Grimoard was elected pope on September 28, 1362; and he chose to be called Pope Urban.

Pope Urban was involved in Italian and European political disputes.[2]

In 1367, the pope traveled from Avignon to Rome. He returned to Avignon in where he died in 1370.[3]

After his death[change | change source]

In 1870, Urban V was beatified by Pope Pius IX.

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

The Coat of Arms of Urban V
  1. "List of Popes," Catholic Encyclopedia (2009); retrieved 2011-11-12.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Pope Bl. Urban V," Catholic Encyclopedia; retrieved 2011-11-12.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. (1843). "Urban V," Penny cyclopaedia, Vol. 26, p. 43.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Urbanus V at Wikimedia Commons

  •  "Pope Bl. Urban V". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913.
  • Catholic Hierarchy, Pope Urban V
  • GCatholic, Pope Urban V


Preceded by
Innocent VI
Pope
1362–1370
Succeeded by
Gregory XI